Following the Sandy Hook shooting, Makerbot really started cracking down on 3D-printed gun part plans on Thingiverse, its database of templates. That's a far cry from scrubbing them from the web however, and it should come as no surprise that a new site has popped up to fill in the gap, specifically with the very plans being stripped from Thingiverse.

DEFCAD is operated by Defense Distrubuted, which has been vocal about its opinion that the removal of such plans is censorship. Admittedly a "makeshift response," DEFCAD only has four parts and no way to upload plans as of yet. Instead, the site's operators want users to email them plans, the ones being pulled from Thingiverse as well as any others.

Whether or not this site will grow from its very simple, largely symbolic existence to a formidable archive of 3D-printed weapon plans is anybody's guess, and its success or failure will depend on (and indicate) how many people out there are really devoted to keeping this sort of information readily available on the web. Sure, 3D-printed weapons don't hold a candle to the real thing, but they can fire a few shots, which is all it takes for them to be dangerous. But it's hard to keep anything off the Internet, and it looks like 3D-printed weapon plans are no exception to that rule. [DEFCAD via The Verge]