Train Upskirt Photo Perv Claims Right to do so Under US Constitution

By Gary Cutlack on at

A Boston man who was rumbled using his phone to take photos up the dress of a lady on a train is claiming he has a right to do so under the country's First Amendment. Because she was in public and not wrapped in a duvet.

The case hinges on bizarre technicalities as to whether ladies in skirts can legally be described as being "partially nude" when out and about in public or not, because if they aren't it means he's in the clear.

The man's legal representative told the court: "If a clothed person reveals a body part whether it was intentional or unintentional, he or she can not expect privacy," inferring that showing a bit of ankle or even some knee is tantamount to whipping it all off in the back of a Ford Focus in a motorway lay-by and inviting bored lorry drivers to come and have a go.

The legal people claim that privacy laws protect naked people in private places, but in public areas, like on trains, the rules don't count. "What he saw was in plain sight. He did not place his camera directly up a women’s skirt. He saw what was in front of him," and that's supposedly not a crime. [Eagle Tribune via The Register]

Image credit: Woman on a train from Shutterstock