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Street Artist Takes Over Derelict Petrol Station with Brilliant Results

By Adam Clark Estes on at

If you've ever wondered what it would be like to live in cartoon, consider visiting Limerick, Ireland—where a street artist recently turned a broken down petrol station into a full-fledged colour party.

Maser, a globally known Irish graffiti artist, calls the finished work "No.27: A Nod to Ed Ruscha." That nod, of course, is in the direction of Ruscha's famous pop art masterpiece "Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas" from 1963. It's just a nod, though. Whereas Ruscha worked with a limited colour palette and a certain dose of realism, Maser went nuts with bold colours and stripes. Even the cars are coated in bright paint:

Street Artist Takes Over Derelict Gas Station with Brilliant Results

Here's the petrol station before Maser went to work on it:

Street Artist Takes Over Derelict Gas Station with Brilliant Results

Maser himself told the local paper that he "creates work that surprises people and questions their relationship with the familiar and the norm, also how dissociated we are from the space around us." He added, "Questioning this is a positive thing."

Well there's no question about it, this project is brilliant. It was made possible by The Draw Out, a cultural incentive run by Limerick Council to rejuvenate derelict areas of the city.   [Street Art News, Limerick Leader]

Street Artist Takes Over Derelict Gas Station with Brilliant Results

And of course, the inspiration:

Street Artist Takes Over Derelict Gas Station with Brilliant Results

Ed Ruscha's "Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas" (1963)