The Endangered Art of Product Design Sketching, Explained by the Pros 

By Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan on at

When it comes to design, nothing beats a model. But it's also hard to overstate the importance of being able to draw while you develop an idea, whether that be by hand or by computer. In a new book out in December, two of the best discuss the fine art of, well, art.

Koos Eissen is a professor at Delft University of Technology who teaches drawing to Industrial Designers. His co-author, Roselien Steur, teaches sketching to professionals. Between them, they've got masses of experience helping people learn how to think with their pencils, as well as some serious real-world chops working with pros.

The combo is what makes their new book, Sketching, Product Design Presentation, look so interesting; it's half a how-to, and half a survey of the very best design-focused drawing out there, from the iMac to headphones to shoes.

But maybe the best part of the book? How it discusses making an argument visually. That's ultimately what any type of sketching for design does: It answers questions, exposes problems, and articulates something about an object that words couldn't. It's a unique and, according to some, endangered skill. You can pick up a copy for about $31. [Amazon]