NASA's Curiosity Rover Looks Like a Tiny Pimple on Mars' Surface

By Darren Orf on at

Do you see it? That incredibly tiny dot in the centre of that blue perimeter. That is NASA's £1.6 billion rover, steadily working away and analysing the Martian soil. This image was captured on Dec. 13th, 2014 by the HiRISE camera housed inside NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover can be seen at the "Pahrump Hills" area of Gale Crater...Pahrump Hills is an outcrop at the base of Mount Sharp. The region contains sedimentary rocks that scientists believe formed in the presence of water...The bright features in the landscape are sedimentary rock and the dark areas are sand. The HiRISE team plans to periodically image Curiosity, as well as NASA's other active Mars rover, Opportunity, as the vehicles continue to explore Mars.

This image is simply breathtaking and a testament to humanity's drive to explore our solar system, but I can't help but feel that Curiosity, and its cousin rover Opportunity, may have one of the loneliest jobs in the universe. [NASA]

Image via NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona