Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

By Maddie Stone on at

Linden Gledhill is a photographer with a background in biochemistry, and lately, he's been using his scientific training to make the microscopic world look absolutely breathtaking.

Glendhill uses one of three basic set-ups to produce his work: Macrophotography, a microscope that reflects light, or a transmission scope, wherein light passes through an object and is captured using differential interference contrast, optical staining, or dark field contrast. What's amazing about Glendhill's work is the variety of ways he's able to manipulate light, causing ordinary things such as soap bubbles and food colouring to take on bizarrely alien forms.

Here are a few of the photographs from Glendhill's portfolio that reveal the stunning microscopic world all around us:

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Soap film using macro photography

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Crystallised food colouring using DIC microscopy

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Soap film using macro photography

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Glue using differential interference contrast microscopy

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Crystalised food colouring dark field lighting

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Soap film using macro photography

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Ferrofluid using reflected light microscopy

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Crystallised food colouring using DIC microscopy

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Crystallised food colouring using DIC microscopy

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Ferrofluid using reflected light microscopy

Science Photographer Reveals Beauty of the Microscopic World

Center of snowflake using DIC microscopy

Gledhill, who's always searching for new and interesting projects to collaborate on, recently produced a series of visuals depicting DNA crystallisation for a genomic sequencing project targeting autistic people. He also just produced an exhibit for Montreal Space for Life that reveals the nanoscale architecture of butterfly wings, and is currently working on a monster movie. You can learn more about Gledhill's work on his website or check out his full portfolio on Flickr. [Linden Gledhill via PetaPixel]

Top image: Ferrofluid using reflected light microscopy. All images are courtesy of Linden Gledhill