This is What Microsoft's Hololens Looks Like in Person

By Sean Buckley on at

We’ve seen it demoed on stage. We've seen the GIFs. We used a janky (but amazing) prototype—but until now we’ve never actually seen Microsoft’s real holographic headset in person. Now, here it is: a weird, futuristic visor with four visible cameras, two speakers and what looks like six buttons.

Let’s take a closer look at hardware behind Microsoft’s augmented, holographic, reality. This is HoloLens.

This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

HoloLens’ smooth, curved plastic frame seems to invoke the style 1980s film makers imagined for the future. It’s the vision of wearable computing I had as a primary school student.


This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

The headset’s transparent displays (as well as an additional acrylic window) are easily viewable from down below, giving us a hint at how Microsoft will overlay your vision with holograms.


This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

You can see a size adjustment wheel at the rear of HoloLens’ headband—which seems to be lined with a nice, comfy layer of felt. Neat! It also looks like there are buttons on the end of the frame’s outer chassis.


This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

Rather than headphones, Microsoft has opted to place small, ambient “floating audio” speakers near the user’s ears. Hopefully it’s loud enough for the user but not so loud as to pollute the soundspace of others in the room.


This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

Up front you can see two of the headset’s cameras—there’s an identical set on the other side of the visor. There are three additional cameras in-between the two pairs too, giving it a total of seven.


This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

Viewed from above, we can see four more buttons—two on each side of the top of the headband. You can also see here that the inner-headband is clearly separated from the outer, which allows it to pivot and adjust to the user’s comfort.


This Is What Microsoft's HoloLens Looks Like In Person

Microsoft has primarily demoed HoloLens with voice and gesture controls, and these buttons seem to be in a kind of an odd place. Pressing a button or two just above your ear doesn’t sound so odd, but the buttons on the back of the band are definitely not a naturally user friendly place. Our best guess is that they open a battery compartment or reveal charging / USB ports. We’ll let you know when we know for sure.

What are you thoughts, Gizmodo readers? Is this something you want to strap to your head? Would you feel silly using it? Is it better, or worse than Google Glass? Leave a comment and let us know what you think!