Interstellar Should be Used in Schools to Teach About Wormholes, Say Experts

By Gerald Lynch on at

Say what you like about Christopher Nolan's divisive sci-fi extravaganza Interstellar (I'll say that it was way, way overrated), but as far as depictions of wormholes in fiction go, it's as compelling and scientifically informed as they come. So much so, in fact, that some experts are now calling that the film be used to teach about the celestial phenomenon in schools.

Dr David Jackson, who printed the paper in the Americal Journal of Physics and in Classical and Quantum Gravity called the decision "a no brainer."

"The physics has been very carefully reviewed by experts and found to be accurate. The publication will encourage physics teachers to show the film in their classes to get across ideas about general relativity."

"The physics has been very carefully reviewed by experts and found to be accurate," he said.

"The publication will encourage physics teachers to show the film in their classes to get across ideas about general relativity."

interstellar

Creating the Interstellar Wormhole

It's a discussion that's greatly pleased the director Nolan, who stated that he had strived for a film as scientifically accurate as possible, at least as far as our current knowledge would allow for.

"The importance of the science was baked in, very much in the DNA of the project from the beginning. And we tried to be true to that initial impulse of looking at reality and what's available to us in terms of the body of knowledge, real physics, real astrophysics and the narrative possibilities that those amazing concepts offer," he said.

Working with theoretical physicist Kip Thorne and special effects team Double Negative, Nolan was able to show in Interstellar a wormhole unlike any before seen in film. Rather than show the wormhole as a giant space-faring vacuum cleaner, sucking up all matter around it, Double Negative created a new suite of software for Interstellar that enabled it to accurately calculate the ways light would travel across the warped space caused by a wormhole. This resulted in high-resolution images capable of showing off detailed filigree patterns consistent with the science community's expectations of wormhole behaviour. [BBC]