Nine More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

By Matt Novak on at

Sometimes it feels like half of the internet is just fake photos. Whether it’s Elvis cutting Johnny Cash’s hair (FAKE), Hillary Clinton posing next to someone in an ‘I’m With Stupid’ t-shirt (FAKE) or John Lennon on a skateboard (FAKE FAKE FAKE), we’re breaking down the latest fakes swirling around the internet.

1. Is this an eclipse from 35,000 feet?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

This photo, purporting to show an eclipse from the perspective of 35,000 feet in the air, is actually 100 per cent fake. As Twitter sleuth Fake Astropix points out, it’s a computer generated image created by Deviant Art user Nethskie in 2010.

Definitely a cool wallpaper for your computer, but not exactly what so many of these OMGSpace Twitter accounts would have you believe it is.

Fake image via SpacePicsHQ


2. Is this John Lennon skateboarding?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

There are actually some wonderful historical photos of movie stars and musicians on skateboards — including Katharine Hepburn and Jodie Foster. But don’t be fooled by the image above. It’s completely fake.

As journalist Scott Jenkins points out, the photo doesn’t show John Lennon skateboarding. It actually comes from the set of the Beatles’ 1964 film A Hard Day’s Nightand was photoshopped to include a skateboard.

Fake photo via History_Pics


3. Is this proof that Sandra Bland was dead before her mugshot was taken?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

Sandra Bland was arrested in Texas after failing to use her turn signal and later committed suicide in jail. People took to social media to talk about the injustice, but some people took things to a strange (and poorly photoshopped) level of conspiracy theory, filled with half-truths and lies.

Some on Facebook and Twitter, while trying to promote the narrative that Bland was actually murdered in prison, think that her mugshot shows her lying on the ground. People have even circulated the badly photoshopped image above, claiming it’s the “real” mugshot. In fact, the image on the left is obviously the fake one.

The authorities in Waller County, Texas have released the footage of her being booked, as well as her mugshot being taken. She was clearly alive at that point. Which doesn’t mean that her arrest and subsequent suicide weren’t a gross miscarriage of justice. But when it comes to questions surrounding her being dead at the time her mugshot was taken, this one is settled.

It’s unclear who first made the photoshopped image on the left, but whoever it is, they’re not helping bring Bland justice.

Fake image via FINEWINE


4. Is this a dog that saved the life of an abandoned newborn?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

As Snopes explains, this photo doesn’t depict the story that’s often attached to it. The image went viral after being posted on the Facebook page of a radio station in Albuquerque back in March of 2014. And it seems to flare up again every few months.

According to the viral image:

A newborn baby abandoned in a forest was saved by a stray dog who carried her across a busy road and through a barbed wire fence to a shed where the infant was discovered nestled with her litter of puppies. Covered by CNN and CBS. Definitely a mans best friend.

Yeah, that never happened. There have been stories of dogs saving babies in many capacities. But the story attached to this stock photo isn’t true.

Fake image via 93.3 KOB-FM


5. Is this Hillary Clinton getting pranked at a campaign event?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

The political fakes are coming fast and furious, despite the fact that we’re still over a year away from the 2016 US Presidential election! And presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton (sorry, but it’s not too early to say that, given the amount of money she’s raised) is a popular target.

A Facebook group called Nation in Distress posted the image above, which supposedly shows Hillary Clinton oblivious to the fact that she’s being pranked. The only problem? It’s a fake. And a bad one at that.

The real photo below:

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

Fake image via Nation in Distress


6. Is this Elvis cutting Johnny Cash’s hair?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

Yes, that really is Elvis Presley. But no, he’s not cutting Johnny Cash’s hair. That’s Elvis’s cousin Gene Smith. For comparison’s sake, you only need to look at the real Johnny Cash on the right. Not even close, right?

Inaccurate photo description via HistoryInPix


7. Is this the world’s happiest elephant?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

No, that’s not the world’s happiest elephant. It’s actually a robot featured at the Disneyland attraction Jungle Cruise. It sure looks happy, but that’s because Disney made it that way. We’ll see how happy it looks when the robot uprising starts and Disney’s robo-elephants enslave humanity.

Inaccurate photo description via AnimaIPic


8. Is this a Haitian woman defending her son?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

No, this isn’t a Haitian woman defending her son. It’s actually a film still from the 2013 movie Cristo Rey. The image first went viral in May of 2014 and has been doing the rounds again in the past few months.

Haitians living in the Dominican Republic are under tremendous stress this summer as strict immigration and residency laws go into effect, creating a refugee crisis. But this photo has nothing to do with the real situation on the ground there.

Fake image via Devilligan


9. Is this Subway selling pea-filled guacamole?

9 More Viral Photos That Are Actually Fake

It’ll be known to our ancestors as the summer of peas. What started as a controversial New York Times food article about adding peas to your guacamole turned into the hottest and dumbest social media debate of the summer. And, of course, it inspired plenty of fakes.

But despite what you might have seen online, Subway isn’t adding peas to its guacamole. It was just a photoshopped joke. This pea-soaked cocktail, on the other hand, is all too real.

Fake image via Cabel


This article originally appeared on Factually, Gizmodo's blog for setting the record straight