Facebook's New Anti-Revenge Porn Strategy Involves People Giving Their Nude Pics to Facebook

By Tom Pritchard on at

Fake news might be the big issue on Facebook (and social media in general) at the moment, but let's not forget that they're also used for a lot more nefarious things. Cyber bullying, promoting extremism, revenge porn, and more. Well Facebook has a new solution to tackle that last one, but it involves sending naked pictures of yourself to Facebook.

Well technically it involves sending those pictures to yourself via Facebook Messenger, but that still means they end up on Facebook's servers. The idea is that Facebook's automated systems can't tell whether someone is uploading a picture of you in barely any clothes (like a bikini, or a flesh coloured morph suit), or one that features you in a more serious state of undress. By giving Facebook pictures of yourself naked, AI can analyse it and better understand what you look like without any clothes on.

Well it doesn't actually know that, but the AI can assign a digital fingerprint to that particular image, enabling it to block anyone else trying to upload it to the site. Essentially meaning that if you're worried someone is going to start spreading naked pictures of you, you'll need to upload each individual picture one at a time. Seems like a bit of a bind really.

The new system is being trialled in Australia, and Australian e-Safety Commissioner Julie Imman Grant has likened it to sending yourself a email. Though obviously it's so much more secure, because it's on Facebook - not some crappy server run by Google. I mean, what do those guys know about the internet and security?

Facebook promises that no real living person will be looking at the picture, so there won't be any situations that look anything like this:

Thank you South Park.

Maybe this will work on Facebook, but that doesn't stop the same pictures from being spread via other sites. The string of ever popular porn sites, for instance, or Twitter . Because Twitter does such a good terrible job at policing its platform the dirtbag spreading them will likely face zero repercussions from the platform. Still I suppose it's something, provided Facebook can make sure the hackers can't get in and pinch them all.

Remember kids, the best way to make sure people don't see your naked pictures is to never take them in the first place. [Slashgear]