architecture
The Gorgeous Spiral Staircase You Can Put Literally Anywhere

Why should a staircase only be for getting to the next floor? The modular and portable nature of the Elementstair, which was inspired by water slides and designed by Floris Schoonderbeek, means you can have a stairway in your home that simply gives you a new point of view. Kind of a fancy version of standing on your chair a la Dead Poets Society. Read More >>

science
Scientists Find First Definitive Genetic Links to Autism

Scientists have uncovered several gene mutations that sharply increase the chances of developing autism. It's the first time researchers have pinpointed a specific genetic component with the spectrum of disorders, which includes Asberger's. Read More >>

health
We've Been Treating the Deadliest Form of Breast Cancer All Wrong

One of the worst things you can hear from you doctor is that you, or a loved one, has "triple negative" breast cancer. It stubbornly refuses to respond to the best treatments available, so doctors have to resort to chemotherapy. It strikes 16 per cent of breast cancer patients, most of them younger than 40. But we may finally have figured out how to beat it. Read More >>

science
Exercise and Caffeine Is a Cancer-Fighting One-Two Punch

This is the study that many of us have been waiting for: exercise combined with caffeine will greatly reduce your risk of skin cancer caused by sun exposure. Read More >>

science
Genetic Atlas Yields a Brainbow of Cognitive Information

Scientists have created the first genetic "atlas" of the human brain, and the result is a very pretty Skittles-esque map of the brain as a rainbow. A brainbow. Read More >>

science
Tooth Tattoo Diagnoses Illness and Alerts Doctors

Scientists have developed a sensor that could be tattooed onto your tooth, diagnose an infection, and transmit that information to medical professionals without you having to go to the doctor. Read More >>

science
How Greenhouse Gasses Made Life on Earth Possible

Scientists have painstakingly measured 2.7 billion-year-old raindrop fossils from South Africa. The size of the ancient droplets tells the story of how the earth was teeming with microbes when it should have been frozen solid. Read More >>

art
The Creepy Awesomeness of Talking Mannequins

Jean Paul Gaultier's retrospective of his 40-plus years of fashion design would have been breathtaking even without bizarre talking mannequins. Read More >>

clothing
How Lab Coats Became a Dying Breed

Lab coats: they're white, mostly plain, boxy. Functional, and ultimately sartorially boring. But ask any doctor or lab tech about their lab coat and they will chat up a storm. Often about how they can't wait to ditch them—if they haven't already. Read More >>

science
A Test That Will Tell You If You're Going To Have a Heart Attack

Scientists have developed a test that detects whether the large, misshapen, mutant cells that indicate you're due for an acute myocardial infarction are circulating through your bloodstream. Read More >>

robots
This Amazing Device Just Made Wheelchairs Obsolete

The young man in this video looks like he's riding a Segway. But Yusuf Adturkoglu was paralysed after falling from a horse five years ago, and he's being mobilised by an amazing device invented by Turkish scientists. Read More >>

science
Scientists Study Cells With a Hacked Deskjet Printer

Scientists at Clemson University in the US have rigged an HP Deskjet 500 printer to make microscope slides full of living cells. It spits out a a special cell-packed ink from the printer's standard cartridge. The process creates cells with temporary permeability in the cell walls, and the holes in the cells are large enough to allow fluorescent molecules to be injected. That glowing stuffing illuminates the membranes, so researchers can get a look at what's happening inside the cells. When studying a heart, for example, the technique can be used to examine how the cardiac muscles respond to mechanical force and fluid shear. Read More >>

science
Scientists Manipulate Electrons Into Material Never Seen on Earth

Stanford scientists have created designer electrons that behave as if they were exposed to a magnetic field of 60 Tesla—a force 30 percent stronger than anything ever sustained on Earth. The work could lead to a revolution in the materials that make everything from video displays to airplanes to mobile phones. Read More >>

computers
Our Robot Overlords Will Have Baby Brains

Scientists are modelling artificial intelligence after baby brains. Why would they want to make computers similar to beings whose favourite pastimes are drooling and pooping? It makes perfect sense when you think about how malleable a baby's gray matter is. Read More >>

science
The First 3D Model of DNA Looks Like the Spinning Beach Ball of Life

Scientists have created the first 3D model of DNA, thanks to a new software buit by a young Harvard scientist. Depicting the way DNA packs itself inside a cell, we couldn't help but see it as a beach ball of life. Read More >>

accessories
Can a Backpack Be Chic?

When Eric Rothenhaus landed a gig as director of design at Jansport five years ago, he wanted to make an impression. He would do it by re-creating, down to the seat-belt straps, the very first JanSport backpack (and the first-ever backpack with a zip) introduced in 1969. Read More >>

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