nsfw
An Insane John McAfee Teaches You How to Uninstall His Own Software (NSFW)

John McAfee is one weird guy, and this video only serves to bolster that reputation. Uploaded to YouTube last night, it's a hilarious — and entirely NSFW — video which sees the man himself teach you how to uninstall McAfee Antivirus. Read More >>

security
Meet the Symbiote: The Ironclad, Adaptable Future of Antivirus Protection

Ang Cui has a lot of power. With enough time he can take control of pretty much any networked device. He could watch you through your iSight or track the Netflix on your smart TV. But he has bigger fish to fry, so your Catfish marathons are safe for now. From him, at least. Read More >>

john mcafee
John McAfee Reveals His Hiding Place

In a too-strange-to-be-true twist on an already bizarre crime story, fugitive tech millionaire John McAfee today revealed where he'd been hiding over the last six days: in his own compound. McAfee, wanted by police in connection with the murder of his neighbour Gregory Faull over the weekend, said in a phone interview that he had never really been on the run at all. He'd just been hiding out at home. The calls were coming from inside the house! Read More >>

privacy
Here's the Man Who Dug Up John McAfee's Secrets

The story of antivirus millionaire turned reclusive murder suspect John McAfee is a long, strange, sordid one. Just a few hours ago, on CBS This Morning, reporter Jeff Wise—who broke the news for Gizmodo—talked about where the McAfee saga stands today, and how we got here in the first place. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Spoonfeeding Users Antivirus Software

Facebook cares about its users. Kind of. With a business model that thrives around its millions upon millions of users, Facebook are looking to help take care of them by directing users who think their computer might be infected to websites where they can get some free antivirus software. Read More >>

anonymous
Hackers Publish Symantec's Source Code After £30,000 Extortion Attempt Fails

Hacker YamaTough has published Symantec's pcAnywhere's source code, the program which is used by users and companies to access personal computers remotely. The publication follows a £30,000 extortion attempt that was made public last night. Read More >>

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