lightning review
Kobo Aura HD Review: A Beautiful Reader Screen Trapped in an Ugly Body

Everyone loves a pretty screen. The Kobo Aura HD is aiming to lead that charge in the ereader space. Armed with a best-in-class screen and an unusually powerful processor under the hood, the Aura HD tries its best to be a real luxury reader. It doesn't quite make it. Read More >>

android
An E-Ink Android Would Only Need Charging Once a Week

At first thought, an e-ink smartphone sounds like a terrible idea. Ugh, all that lag. But think about the light weight, low cost, and insane battery life, and you can see why eInk, the company behind the screen in Kobos and Kindles, is pushing its new prototype phone hard. Read More >>

tablets
Flexible E Ink Tablets Hands-On: They'll Probably Be Neat Someday, But Not Right Now

Tablets are getting thinner and thinner, and the end result is bound to be tablets that are paper thin. Well, we're almost there, it's a just a question of exactly how handy that'll really be. Read More >>

chatroom
E-Ink or LCD: Which Do You Prefer for Books?

Amazon's Kindle Fire HD is being pegged as a do it all device. Video, internet, magazines, games, etc. And of course, there are books. But I'm not sold on LCD screens for hardcore reading. Sure its fine for a magazine article or two, but when it comes time to sit down and read dozens, if not hundreds, of pages in a single sitting, i prefer an ereader every time. It's just easier on the eyes. Am I crazy? Read More >>

lightning review
Kindle Touch Lightning Review: The Only Book Gadget You Need

We've more or less accepted e-readers as the best way to read a book digitally, but there's still a whole lot that gadgets can do that e-readers suck at—literally anything you own with a screen is better at this stuff than an e-reader. The Kindle Touch is the first to really bridge that gap in a way that makes sense. Read More >>

guts
Finally, an Electronic Paper Display I Can Crumple Up and Throw Away

E-ink technology is easier on the eyes for reading, even if the devices it's currently deployed in feel nothing like a book or magazine. But AU Optronics gives us another tantalising look at the future with a proof of concept ereader that's completely self-powered, while still as flexible as a piece of paper. Read More >>

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