architecture
Nine of the Coolest Prefab Houses in History

Prefab is a buzzy topic in architecture and design circles right now, but it's hardly a new concept. The idea of building houses in factories and shipping them to their destinations is at least a century old. Now, Taschen has published the history of these homes in a lovely coffee-table book. Read More >>

environment
Turkey's New Eco City Could Be Heated with Leftover Pistachio Shells

As one of the world's largest producer of pistachios, Turkey has plenty of pistachio shells to go around. So, in the tradition of turning food waste into energy, officials are proposing to burn pistachio shells for heat in Turkey's first ever eco city—and it's not a totally nutty idea. Read More >>

environment
Sellafield's Huge Nuclear Waste Dump Will Be Washed Away By Rising Sea Levels

Sellafield, the dumping ground for nuclear waste located near Cumbria on the Irish sea is "virtually certain" to be washed away by rising sea levels, a new report warns. The UK Environment Agency has admitted that constructing the Drigg Low-Level Waste Repository so near the coast was a mistake, and that one million cubic metres of nuclear waste will begin leaking into the ocean "a few hundred to a few thousand years from now." Read More >>

apple
Apple Will Recycle Any Device You Give Back, Promises Tim Cook-Narrated Ad

Starting today, all of Apple's retail stores will accept any of the company's ageing products for recycling—and, if it looks resaleable, you might even get some store credit, too. Read More >>

environment
The California Drought's So Bad, They're Drinking Toilet Water

At this point, we all know that California's superdrought is bad—really bad. We don't yet know how Californians are going to cope with the consequences. According to a recent billion dollar (£590 million) allocation of taxpayer money for water recycling programs, drinking toilet water is one way. Read More >>

environment
There Was an Ickle Earthquake in Rutland This Morning

Rather than being woken by their alarm clocks this morning, those living in Rutland in the East Midlands were shook from their sleep by a 3.2 magnitude earthquake. Read More >>

environment
Dyson Imagines Massive Floating Rubbish Vacuum to Suck up Man's Plastic Crap

James Dyson's sketched out the idea of a new form of sucking machine, one so large it requires a barge to house it. The idea being to set it free and let it "mine" rivers of all the floating plastic junk that's been chucked into them since man first invented plastics. Read More >>

environment
Do Cow Farts Actually Contribute to Global Warming?

There are currently approximately 1.3 to 1.5 billion cows grazing, sleeping, and chewing their cud at any given time on planet Earth. And these 590-kilo (average weight for both a beef and dairy cow) animals eat a lot. Much like humans, when they eat, gas builds up inside of their guts and has to be expelled. (See Why Beans Make You Fart) Cows fart and burp… a lot. The result is a large amount of methane being introduced into the atmosphere. Read More >>

environment
UN: Ships Need to Shut Up So Whales and Dolphins Can Hear

The noises made by the gargantuan boats that move our stuff from one continent to another are ruining marine life. So this week, new regulations have been issued by the International Maritime Organization, the sea-faring agency of the United Nations, asking shipping companies to turn down the volume. Read More >>

environment
Shipping Containers Lost at Sea, and the Search for Flight MH370

Just how many large mysterious objects can there be floating at sea? That's what many of us have wondered after the search for debris from Malaysia Airlines 370 turned up piece after piece of ocean junk. Read More >>

environment
Hypnotic Flapping Wing Turbines Keep Working in the Gentlest Breeze

There have been many proposed alternatives to the spinning propeller blades used on wind turbines installed all over the county, but none as unorthodox as Festo's new DualWingGenerator. Inspired by the company's work on winged flying robots, the design keeps working when winds are as slow as nine miles per hour. Read More >>

environment
The US Grows the Most Productive Plants in the World, Says NASA

Remember learning about America's "amber waves of grain?" Probably not, you're from the UK, but over yonder it's a lyric from a well known patriotic song. As it turns out that the United States' bread basket—a.k.a., the Corn Belt—is even more productive than previously thought. In fact, during its growing season, it's the most productive land on Earth, according to new NASA data. Read More >>

money
The US Government Would Save £240 Million if it Just Switched Typefaces

Of the many schemes to make the government more efficient, this is probably the only one that involves typography. A teenager in Pittsburgh has calculated that by simply switching the typeface used in government documents from Times New Roman to Garamond, it would save taxpayers $400 million (£240 million) in ink. Read More >>

booze
Miserable Winter May Trigger UK "Cider Drought"

Get the pints queued up, as there might be a run on that nice kind of apple juice that's so easy to glug down. The National Association of Cider Makers suggests brewers may struggle to find enough apples this year, after the wet winter over saturated many of the apple trees used to create the brew. Read More >>

environment
Stock Up on Suncream as Killer Heatwave Summers Will Increase

The odd heatwave is treated like the Second Coming in dreary old Britain. But will we welcome blistering summers when they become the norm? A new Met Office report suggests that European summers will swelter as standard come the year 2040. Read More >>

giz explains
How Global Warming is Dissolving Sea Life (and What We Can do About It)

The last time Earth's oceans were this acidic, a six mile-wide sulphur-rich space rock had just smashed into the Yucatan Peninsula, unleashing a deluge of acid rain that exterminated all sea life in the the top 400 metres of the water column. Now, some 65 million years after the Cretaceous extinction, human activity is threatening to similarly decimate the ocean's ecosystem—this time, from the bottom up. Read More >>

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