phones
Nokia Lumia 930 Hands-On: An Icon by Any Other Name

If you've had your eye on Nokia's Icon and were miffed to find that its Verizon network exclusivity would forever keep it from UK shores, breathe easy -- Nokia's new Lumia flagship, the Nokia Lumia 930 smartphone, is essentially the same phone. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Fire TV Hands On: The Fastest Smart TV You've Ever Met

Amazon pitched its Fire TV as a streaming device to end all streaming devices. The company touted its simple and effective search, and its open ecosystem boasting enough apps to burn your eyes out. We spent some time messing with the Fire TV and found that for the most part, it makes good on those promises. Read More >>

BBC
Hands-On With the Brand New BBC iPlayer

A catch-up services innovator since first launching back in 2007, the BBC today revealed a brand new design for its industry-leading iPlayer streaming platform. Rolling out to mobile and desktop browsers today, I've spent some time playing with the new-look iPlayer in a desktop browser, and while its changes are subtle, they're all welcome. Read More >>

televisions
LG's WebOS TV Hands-On: An Awesome Resurrection

CES this year has seen LG give official word that it would be using WebOS as the brains for 78-percent of its upcoming smart TVs. There was a lot to like about WebOS back when it ran on smartphones, but we were a bit skeptical about how it would get by in a smart TV. After all, smart TV user interfaces are almost universally bad. Not this time. We just got to spend some hands-on time with WebOS running on a few of LG's 2014 TVs, and we really liked what we saw. The first thing you'll notice is that navigation is incredibly fast. Using the joystick on the remote control, you guide the cursor around the screen, and as you do things pop up instantly. Not only that, everything is animated and really attractive. From the home screen you can access all of your favourite apps (and there are a lot already, from Netflix to Google Maps). If you don't like how they're laid out, you can just drag and drop to move them around. Very intuitive. There are a fair number of second-screen like features built-in. For example if you're watching a Danish murder mystery on TV you can pop open an overlay on the right side that will give you more info on it, and/or links to other shows it thinks you'll like. It's all very nicely integrated. The LG store acts as a sort of integrated hub for content. There you'll be able to download movies, TV shows, apps, and even games. You can plug a USB controller directly into the TV and play games as if there were a console attached. Or, if you don't have a physical controller, you can download an app to your smartphone and use it as a remote (it pairs via Wi-Fi). It was pretty responsive when playing a Spiderman game that had been downloaded for the demo, and while it looked pretty good, we're not talking PS4 graphics here or anything. One of the sticking points is text entry. If you wanted to enter in some search terms, or type a URL into the built-in web browser, you'd have to pull open a keyboard, and hunt and peck your way through with the cursor. That's how Roku players work, too, and it's very tedious. To counter this, LG has included options for voice and gesture controls. Using a voice search we were able to get the upcoming weather forecast and search for content. It wasn't entirely accurate, but to be fair, there was a lot of background noise. Hopefully it would work better in a home environment. The gestures are slick, too. You just raise a finger in the air (a polite one, please) and it immediately brings up an interface for adjusting the channel or volume simply by waving your finger. You can also bring your finger up to your lips to instantly mute. It was surprisingly responsive, though we have yet to see how it handles a room full of furniture and people. Some of the higher-end TVs will come with built-in cameras for this. Others will require you to purchase the small camera separately, and while WebOS will be on some of LG's Blu-ray players, the voice and gestures will be limited to the TVs. Overall, we were really impressed by how polished the system looked and how responsive it is. We generally hate smart TV UIs, but this felt like something very different. I can say without question that it's the best smart TV interface I've ever seen. It was actually smart! It didn't look like an early-2000s feature-phone. It didn't lag or stutter. It was designed like it was meant to be on a beautiful 4K TV, and that says a lot. Obviously, we only got to see a little bit of it, and the only thing we were allowed to use ourselves was the gesture control, so only time will tell if it can measure up to these auspicious first impressions. Hopefully we'll be reviewing one when they start rolling out later this year. Read More >>

tv
Hands On: I Just Fell In Love With LG's Flexible 4K OLED TVs

The other night we saw a bunch of Samsung's curved 4K TVs, including a gigantic one that could flex between flat and curved. They looked pretty good. LG's curved 4K OLED TVs absolutely blow them out of the water. Read More >>

tablets
LG's Made an iPad Mini For the Android Lovers

It's safe to say that Android tablets haven't quite managed to capture the aesthetic beauty of Apple's iPad mini. Sure, there have been some good looking ones, and the Nexus 7 certainly isn't ugly, but none of the smaller tablets have really compared to the elegant and simplistic design of Jony Ive's mini, until now. Meet the LG G Pad 8.3. Read More >>

samsung
Eyes-On With Samsung's OLED UHD TV of the Future

The combination of 4K resolution and OLED display technology sure makes for a potentially tasty concoction, and boy does it live up to its promise. It may be just a prototype, but Samsung's OLED UHD display is the most gorgeous TV I've ever seen. Read More >>

sony
Sony Made the First Curved LED TV, and It's Worthy of Your Lust

Sony unveiled a mountain of new gear at its IFA press conference yesterday, but for whatever reason it decided to quietly slip this beauty out under all the noise. Comparable to the 55-inch OLED set that Samsung unveiled at CES, Sony's new 65-inch, 1080P, S990A is the first set to put a gentle curve on LED flatscreen technology. And since LED sets are pretty common these days, it means the S990A is available for pre-order in the US right now for just $4,000 (£2,600), and hopefully the UK too soon, compared to the £6,000 that Samsung wants for its curvy offering. Read More >>

phones
LG G2 Hands-On: Killer Hardware, Software Dead on Arrival

We managed to get some hands-on with the LG's new flagship, the G2. It's a phone that has everything going for it, except for the using it part. Read More >>

google
Nexus 7 Hands On: A Giant Leap for Google-Kind

The new 7's screen is brighter and slightly larger than last year's model, packed with deeper colors and full HD resolution (which when combined with Netflix's new 1080p streaming service looks incredible). The UI navigation is quick, crisp, and snappy without the minor lag when flipping between apps or Chrome tabs. Read More >>

nokia
Nokia Lumia 1020 Hands On: This Actually Might Be Amazing

The first question you'll have about Nokia's new Lumia 1020 is how the photos look. And yes, they're so very sharp. But what may have been overlooked is that the rest of the phone, which is still, you know, a phone, is (almost surprisingly) on point too. Read More >>

sony
Sony Xperia Z Ultra Hands-On: Wow, This Thing Is Huge

Sony's just busted out its entry into the dreaded phablet market, and there's no getting around it: Sony's Xperia Z Ultra is massive -- bigger than even the Samsung Galaxy Mega 6.3 -- but it's an absolute power-house, and thin too. Read More >>

samsung
Samsung Galaxy S4 Active Hands-On: This is What the S4 Should Have Been

Samsung made its bulging line of Galaxy S4 variants doubly official tonight in London, finally showing off the tasty-looking Galaxy S4 Active. We had a little play with it to see what all the fuss was about. Read More >>

apple
OS X Mavericks First Impressions: A Little Good Going a Long Way

Mavericks is the first OS X release since Snow Leopard that doesn't constantly make you stop, consider a new feature that has just made your life worse in some incomprehensible way, and then hope very hard that this is a bug; because it cannot possibly be an intended feature, because the world is, mostly, a basically good place where people (like software engineers) do not deliberately inflict things like Launchpad on good, hardworking people. Read More >>

tablets
Hands-On With Toshiba's New Android Tablets: Stunning Specs But Shocking Design

Toshiba's just launched a trio of new Android Excite tablets, and on paper they look pretty sweet: a budget £250 machine, and a more interesting pair of Tegra 4-powered tablets that are gunning after the high-end Android tablet market, all powered by sweet sweet stock 'Droid. In the flesh, though, they don't exactly live up to their promise. In fact, they're all-round a little disappointing. Read More >>

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