health
UK's £560m Flu Drug Stockpile's Effectiveness Slammed

Remember the 2005 bird flu and 2009 swine flu outbreaks? The life-threatening viruses threatened to explode at pandemic proportions across the globe before sliding out of public consciousness as the threat died down. But worries concerning the illnesses have been re-ignited, after the effectiveness of the UK's £560m flu drug stockpile has been called into question. Read More >>

science
Bad News: E-Cigs Alter Cells a Lot Like Tobacco Does

A new cancer study brings more bad news to the e-cigarette industry. Scientists exposed human bronchial cells to e-cig vapour and found that it altered the cells in a way not dissimilar to tobacco. In other words, that delicious, seemingly risk-free nicotine vapour might not be so benign, after all. Read More >>

medicine
Is it a Good Idea to Vaporise and Inhale Alcohol?

Vaporising, and then inhaling alcohol has gained a lot of attention lately. In the 1950s it was introduced as a treatment for excessive fluid in your lungs, called pulmonary oedema. It's now gained popularity as a way to quickly become intoxicated. Proponents of this process-to-become-plastered, tout several benefits compared to drinking it. Many claim you get drunk without any calorie intake. Some state, because you bypass the liver, you can eliminate the alcohol quickly and avoid the dreaded alcohol hangover. Read More >>

science
Nanoparticles in Consumer Products Could Be Damaging Your DNA

Masses of products—from cosmetics to clothing—now contain nanoparticles, to kill microbes, lengthen shelf life or provide other wonderful properties. But new research from MIT and Harvard suggests they could also be damaging your DNA. Read More >>

google glass
Google Glass is Now Literally a Lifesaving Device

You may look like a dick when you're wearing them, but a fashion faux-pas is excusable when lives are at stake. Whether you like the look of Google Glass or not, it's hard to argue against its potential usefulness when presented with this story about its lifesaving capabilities. Read More >>

science
First Ever Lab-Grown Muscle That Can Heal Itself in Living Creatures

Anyone who's ever torn a muscle will be grateful for that fact that the fibres can repair themselves. But now, researchers have developed lab-grown muscle that can achieve the exact same thing. Read More >>

food
Don't Eat the Russian Cheese, it's Had Men in it

The above image appears to show workers in a Russian cheese factory taking a bath in milk, milk that investigators decided was destined to be turned into a uniquely man-flavoured local blend. Read More >>

medicine
During a Transplant Does the Donor’s DNA Integrate Into the Host?

Depending on the type of donation, the DNA stays for a short time, a long while—or maybe even forever. Read More >>

image cache
The First Detailed Map of a Mammal's Neural Network

If this looks like an incredibly complex wiring diagram to you, it's because it is essentially that: you're looking at the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas, the first detailed map of any mammal's neural network. Read More >>

science
Exploding Head Syndrome is a Real Thing

Jarred awakes from a sound sleep by a "shotgun blast, a thunderclap . . . the clash of symbols, a lightning strike or the sound of every door in the house slamming." As with others who have his condition, sufferers of exploding head syndrome (EHS) wake terrified, only to realise the noise was just a figment of their imaginations. Read More >>

collection
22 Strange Medical Instruments From the Past

In the history of medicine, machines became crucial parts of the diagnostic and treatment process in the first half of the 20th century. Scientists and doctors experimented with some really strange devices, and they developed a lot of creepy-looking health equipment—at least some of which seems almost horrific, seen through the eyes of today. The following 22 instruments are partly scary, partly weird, and partly awesome—just as inventions should be. Read More >>

health
Why are Vitamins Named Using the Alphabet?

Easily identifiable by simple terms, the vitamins we recognise today were only recently isolated, identified and named. Read More >>

health
A Cup of Earl Grey Tea Might Save Your Life

You may sing from the hilltops the virtues of a good mug of PG Tips or Tetley's, but if you consider a cuppa a lifesaver in the mornings, you might want to posh up your brew with a few Earl Grey teabags instead. Researchers now believe that the beverage could help massively in the fight against heart disease. Read More >>

health
Brace Your Bowels: Scientists Say TEN Veg Servings a Day are Needed to Not Die of Everything

If you want to not die of everything in your late thirties, you may have to spend a bit more time in the fruit and vegetable aisle of your local supermarket browsing the lumpy green things, with one health think-tank suggesting the five-a-day fruit and veg serving advice should be doubled to ten. Read More >>

health
Sanitiser-Dispensing Door Handles Ensure Hospital Staff Stay Clean

When you work in an environment that's all about battling germs, bacteria, and disease, common sense dictates that you should always keep your hands clean. But that's easier said than done, at least until these clever PullClean sanitiser dispensing door handles are installed in every hospital, doctor's office, and clinic around the world. Read More >>

science
The Spray-on Surgical Film That Could Make Stiches Redundant

Surgeries, major or minor, virtually always require stitches—but they can prove uncomfortable and painful, or even become infected. Now, a spray-on film of biodegradable polymer nanofibres could replace them for good. Read More >>

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