science
Watch Bacteria Instantly Turn Water Into Ice

How does it work? It's the same principle behind how snow forms in the atmosphere (and in artificial snow machines, too—we'll get to that later). An ice crystal needs to form around a nucleus, which can be a bit of dust, soot, pollen, or, as we've seen, bacteria. Pure water doesn't have to crystallise into ice until it's as cold as -48 C below zero. In the demo here, the water has been supercooled to about -29 C, but it only freezes over after the P. syringae is added. Read More >>

watch this
Watch These Specially-Filmed Ice Crystals Melt in Psychedelic Style

The video of these ice crystals melting was taken by Shawn Knol using cross-polarised light – a special form of microscopy. It creates a truly beautiful effect in the ice, one that would make any psychonaut drool. Read More >>

space
The North American Great Lakes are Even More Beautiful When They're Nearly Frozen Over

For the first time since 1994 the North American Great Lakes are almost completely covered in ice, with only 12 per cent remaining unfrozen. Now, thanks to NASA satellites, we can look upon this icy plain and despair—except that it's actually quite beautiful. Read More >>

architecture
Experimental Architecture: Ice-Climbing Structures

The design and fabrication of artificial ice-climbing structures is an incredible form of experimental architecture. The resulting constructions are often astonishing: ice-covered loops, ledges, branches, and towers reminiscent of the playful 1960s experiments of Archigram, yet serving as some of the most spatially interesting athletic venues in all of today's professional sports. Read More >>

architecture
Efficient New Skyscrapers Are Raining Chunks of Ice Down On Us

One particularly cold, sunny day, thousands arriving in Lower Manhattan were forced to reroute their commute. All because huge slivers of ice were cracking off One World Trade Center and plunging hundreds of feet down onto the street. And it isn't alone. Read More >>

art
7 Surreal, Towering Ice Castles That You Can Actually Visit

Are you sick and tired of skiing and ice skating? Why not take a trip to see one of America's mind-bendingly amazing ice castles. It's like a walking through a frosty landscape dreamt up by Richard Serra but built by nature. Tickets are now available! Read More >>

watch this
This Graceful Drone Flight Reveals the Gnarled Reality of Antarctica

Antarctica looks amazing from space—but this video shows that its gnarled canyons and caves look equally impressive close-up, too. Read More >>

wtf
US Soldiers in Iraq Were Fed Ice From Unsanitised Morgue Containers

US soldiers have been on the receiving end of some pretty gruesome news over the past few days. As part of a US Justice Department suit against military contractor Kellogg, Brown and Root, it's been revealed that soldiers serving in Iraq in 2003 and 2004 consumed ice from unsanitised containers that also served as makeshift morgues. Read More >>

locations
New York's East River Looks Spectacular Half-Frozen

New York's frozen East River—seen from Pier 1 Playground in Brooklyn—is evidence of the extraordinary cold temperatures gripping much of the central and eastern United States this week. Video of the scene shows the ice choked waters moving at a surreal and unexpected speed. Read More >>

science
Antarctic Ice is Hiding a Super-Trench Way Deeper Than the Grand Canyon

The ice sheet that covers Antarctica is ancient, hiding a whole landscape of mountains and valleys that once teemed with life (more than 80 million years ago, that is). Using radar and satellite footage, scientists are studying this hidden world—and they just found a two mile deep canyon down there. Read More >>

music
8 Otherworldly Songs Performed on Instruments Made of Ice

We're smack-dab in the middle of winter and baby, it's cold outside (or so I've heard; I live over in LOL). I imagine that it might be tough to find the beauty in yet another day of icy temperatures, but for some enterprising creative types, bone-chilling frost is more than a major nuisance—it's the stuff that musical dreams are made of. Read More >>

locations
Swedish Ice Hotel Adds London Tube Train to Chiselled Exhibits

The ICEHOTEL, in a region that calls itself Swedish Lapland, has completed this year's collection of ice-made artistic treasures, which include a suite inspired by the London Underground's 150th anniversary. All the fun of being on the tube without any of the sweat. Read More >>

history
Rock Piles, Graves, and Ice Caves are Historic Monuments in Antarctica

On these frigid days, it helps to think about a place like Antarctica, which was recently determined to be without a doubt the coldest place on Earth (as if anyone was really surprised?). But it's also home to unique historic monuments befitting the treacherous environment that include 100-year-old huts, industrial tractors, and even one nuclear power plant—but, often, they're literally just a pile of rocks. Read More >>

science
We've Finally Figured Out Why Hot Water Freezes Faster Than Cold

For centuries, scientists have puzzled over a counter-intutive observation: hot water, for some reason, seems to freeze faster than cold. Fortunately, now a team of physicists has worked out why it happens. Read More >>

boats
The First Icebreaking Ship That Drifts Sideways To Cut a Larger Path

Like an arctic version of the Tokyo Drift, a new icebreaking ship called the NB 508 will actually drift sideways through frozen lakes and rivers. It's not to capture some incredibly boring sub-zero gymkhana footage, though, but to clear a larger path through the ice for other ships to follow without getting stuck. Read More >>

science
A Rare Glimpse Inside the Research Stations at the End of the World

What does it take to build a habitable structure at the bottom of the world? Quite a bit of technology, for starters. The climate of the extreme south and north poles is unlike any other. Unstable ice, immense snowfall and incredibly low temperatures can—literally, in at least one case—chew up and spit out entire buildings. Not these, though. Read More >>

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