research
Researchers Invent a Camouflage Material That Changes Like a Chameleon

Mother Nature has already mastered the art of camouflage, so it only makes sense that we steal her ideas when it comes to the art of hiding. Researchers over in the US at the University of Michigan have developed a remarkable new material "inspired" by chameleons, which can change shape and colour under different lighting conditions. Read More >>

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Watch GE Torture-Test Supermaterials in the Most Vicious Ways

The heat of an active volcano. A 5,000 lb weight dropped from above. A sandstorm that lasts ten years. These are just some of the ways GE torture-tests the super-strong materials that go into jet engines, wind turbines, and more. And thanks to the company's fascinating YouTube channel, we get an up-close view of the process. No safety goggles required. Read More >>

science
How You Can Make Graphene at Home in Your Blender

Graphene may be the supermaterial to rule them all—but it turns out you can make it at home. In your kitchen blender. Here's how. Read More >>

science
Advanced Concrete Could Last More Than a Century Without Maintenance

A new water-repellent concrete impregnated with tiny superstrong fibres promises to leave roads and bridges free of major cracks for up to 120 years. Read More >>

science
The Cool Promise of Machines That Run on Body Heat

The human body at rest radiates 100 watts of heat—heat that does nothing other than make crowded rooms stuffy. But body heat can be converted to electricity, and new technology is always improving the process. With the rise of wearables, the body heat-powered device becomes an ever more tantalising promise. Read More >>

science
Self-Destructing Electronics are Here and They are Awesome

A renegade professor and his team at Iowa State just unveiled a mind-bending new technology. Put bluntly, they've created self-destructing electronics: gadgets that disappear with the flip of a switch. And, yes, it's just like Mission Impossible. Read More >>

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This is What it Looks Like When a Liquid Simultaneously Freezes and Boils

In thermodynamics, there's a concept known as triple point: it's a combination of temperature and pressure where a substance can exist as a solid, liquid and gas, all at the same time. This is what it looks like. Read More >>

science
The Spray-on Surgical Film That Could Make Stiches Redundant

Surgeries, major or minor, virtually always require stitches—but they can prove uncomfortable and painful, or even become infected. Now, a spray-on film of biodegradable polymer nanofibres could replace them for good. Read More >>

science
This Synthetic Mother of Pearl is Ten Times Tougher Than Ceramics

Ceramics are an increasingly common material to work with—from hard-wearing bearings to heat-proof cladding on spacecraft—but they all share one fatal weakness: they're fragile. Now, though, inspired by nature, researchers are making a ceramic that mimics mother of pearl—and is ten times stronger than normal ceramics. Read More >>

science
Your Bones Don't Shatter Because They're Full of Goo

Many of us have suffered from broken bones, but it's rare, outside of the most serious accidents, for bones to ever shatter. Now, researchers have worked out why: because our bones, it turns out, are filled with goo. Read More >>

science
MIT's Living E. Coli Materials Could Provide Self-Aware Surfaces

Researchers at MIT have been busy creating a new type of biofilms—sheets of living E. Coli cells combined with materials such as gold nanoparticles and quantum dots—that could provide large, self-aware surfaces. Read More >>

science
Disordered Hyperuniformity: A Weird New State of Matter in Chicken Eyes

Despite what you learned in school, there are way more than four states of matter. One possible new one, disordered hyperuniformity, was recently found in the weirdest place – the eyes of chickens. Read More >>

science
Amazing Aerogel: Eight Looks at the Ghostly Supermaterial in Action

Aerogel must be one of the strangest supermaterials to ever exist. Ghostly and shimmering in appearance, it's insanely light, incredibly strong, and an amazing thermal insulator. And its tricks look absolutely impossible when you see them up close. Read More >>

science
The Only Time You'll Ever Feel Bad for a Brown Recluse Spider

Meet Rabbit, the only brown recluse spider you're ever going to feel sorry for. That's because you're watching her be restrained and milked for her super-strong silk. Oof. Read More >>

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Why is Glass Transparent?

In fact, it might be better to ask not why glass is transparent, but why other materials are not transparent—which is exactly what Mark Miodownik, the great material scientist and communicator, does in this video. Read More >>

military
The History of Invisibility and the Future of Camouflage

In 2004, the U.S. Army made a colossal mistake. It introduced a new digital camouflage called the Universal Camouflage Pattern (UCP), a single pattern designed to work across all environments. Only a few months later, however, as the war in Iraq was intensifying by the day, every soldier on the ground knew the truth: by trying to work in every situation, UCP worked in none of them. Read More >>

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