monster machines
This Bionic Ankle Walks Like it's Alive

The human lower leg is a marvel of biological engineering—it lets you have a long, strong stride while minimising exertion and joint strain. But conventional spring and hydraulically-driven prosthesis worn by amputees offer no such benefit and can cause osteoarthritis-inducing skeletal strains. The BiOM T2 system aims to rectify that. Read More >>

science
Predict What Your Future Children Look Like in "Virtual Embryos"

Remember those slightly horrifying sites that mash up two faces to tell you what your hypothetical babies might look like? With genome sequencing and "virtual embryos," we might actually be able to do that—using science. Read More >>

science
Scientists Have Cloned Embryos From Adult Cells for the First Time Ever

Ever since Dolly the sheep was cloned eighteen years ago, scientists have been trying and failing to use that same technique to create cloned human embryos from adult cells. Now, they've finally succeeded, in what could a major step toward personalised organ transplants and other therapies that rely on a pool of stem cells. Read More >>

design
A 3D-Printed Ultrasound Cast That Looks Awesome and Heals You Faster

Old-fashioned casts are nasty, a festering stinksleeves that you wear like a medieval torture device for what seems like forever. 3D-printed casts take care of the smell and itch issues, and now Deniz Karasahin has designed the next step: a custom cast with an ultrasound device to speed up bone healing. Read More >>

health
How Yesterday's Drugs Became the Medicines of Today

My sister is a witch. Or, more precisely, a Wiccan astrologer and tarot reader. Growing up as a kid who worshipped Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking, I found it hard to square her worldview with my own. Read More >>

science
A Rare Genetic Mutation in These Siblings Makes Them Immune to Viruses

Viruses are incompetent but smart little things. Unable to make proteins on their own, they hijack ours for their own nefarious purposes. But what if we gave the viruses broken proteins? An incredibly rare genetic disorder in a brother and sister pair does exactly that, making them immune to many classes of viruses—and suggesting new possibilities for antiviral treatments. Read More >>

health
Everyone Has Haemorrhoids (Yes, Even You)

Much like toilet-humour at the dinner table, hemorrhoids can be a taboo subject. The truth is, everyone has them. Read More >>

science
Scientists Say They've Created Artificial Blood for Humans

Somebody ring the bell at the blood factory, because it's almost time to get those assembly lines running. Almost. A team of British scientists say they've created red blood cells suitable for transfusion into humans, a breakthrough that could change the lives of millions—if it works. Read More >>

research
Cutting-Edge Cancer Research: Cannibalism, Zombies & Suicidal Cells

Cancer research is tough stuff—but it's also surprisingly gruesome, too. This Sci Show video explains how the latest insights into curing the disease include cannibalism, zombies and suicidal cells. Read More >>

health
"It's Not Cybersex, I'm Showing it to a Doctor" as Skype GP Visits Set to Become the Norm

Doctors in the UK may soon start consulting with patients remotely, with the government putting plans into place that could see younger and more forward-thinking GPs able to consult with younger and more forward-thinking patients via video chat tools. Read More >>

maps
Tracking an Ebola Outbreak in a City Without Maps

If you Google Map Guéckédou, the Guinean city smack dab in the Ebola virus's deadly domain right now, you'd see just an abstract blotch of beige and yellow. Zoom all the way in on satellite view, and you can barely make out the outlines of buildings. Don't even think about trying Street View. Google Maps simply reflects the state of mapping in parts of Guinea. There are no good maps of Guéckédou—until the good folks of the internet help create one. Read More >>

science
Doctors Can Now Grow Engineered Vaginas in Women

After decades of work, a team of doctors say they've successfully engineered vaginas that have been implanted and grown in women. The vaginas were grown in a lab from the female patients' own cells and later transferred to their bodies, where they formed into normal vaginas. The breakthrough bears some huge implications, too. Read More >>

research
Scientists Manipulate Genes to Make Old Organs Young Again (in Mice)

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh showed this week that they could teach an old mouse's thymus to bounce back to a healthy, youthful state, simply by manipulating a single protein that controls gene expression. It's the first time scientists have been able to regenerate a living organ by gene manipulation, and it could have huge implications in health science. Read More >>

medicine
This Amoeba Eats Human Intestines, Cell by Cell

It might look positively adorable in this image, but don't be fooled: this pathogen, known as Entamoeba histolytica, eats human intestines alive, cell by cell. Read More >>

google glass
Could Google Glass Really Help People with Parkinson's?

While the world has been squabbling about Glassholes, doctors have quietly been testing the potential of Google Glass in medicine. Features that may seem silly to use in a cafe or on the subway have real advantages in the doctor's office. Hand-free control? Remote diagnosis? On-demand medical records? Check check check. Now researchers are testing how Glass could benefit patients with Parkinson's. Read More >>

health
UK's £560m Flu Drug Stockpile's Effectiveness Slammed

Remember the 2005 bird flu and 2009 swine flu outbreaks? The life-threatening viruses threatened to explode at pandemic proportions across the globe before sliding out of public consciousness as the threat died down. But worries concerning the illnesses have been re-ignited, after the effectiveness of the UK's £560m flu drug stockpile has been called into question. Read More >>

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