google glass
Could Google Glass Really Help People with Parkinson's?

While the world has been squabbling about Glassholes, doctors have quietly been testing the potential of Google Glass in medicine. Features that may seem silly to use in a cafe or on the subway have real advantages in the doctor's office. Hand-free control? Remote diagnosis? On-demand medical records? Check check check. Now researchers are testing how Glass could benefit patients with Parkinson's. Read More >>

health
UK's £560m Flu Drug Stockpile's Effectiveness Slammed

Remember the 2005 bird flu and 2009 swine flu outbreaks? The life-threatening viruses threatened to explode at pandemic proportions across the globe before sliding out of public consciousness as the threat died down. But worries concerning the illnesses have been re-ignited, after the effectiveness of the UK's £560m flu drug stockpile has been called into question. Read More >>

science
How These Microscopic Diamonds are Going to Shape the Future

No doubt you're already familiar with the many ways graphene promises to save us all, but there's another (so-called) miracle material out there vying for your attention—and it's sparkly, to boot. Say hello to the latest and greatest substance to kick science's ass straight into the future: the nanodiamond. Read More >>

medicine
Is it a Good Idea to Vaporise and Inhale Alcohol?

Vaporising, and then inhaling alcohol has gained a lot of attention lately. In the 1950s it was introduced as a treatment for excessive fluid in your lungs, called pulmonary oedema. It's now gained popularity as a way to quickly become intoxicated. Proponents of this process-to-become-plastered, tout several benefits compared to drinking it. Many claim you get drunk without any calorie intake. Some state, because you bypass the liver, you can eliminate the alcohol quickly and avoid the dreaded alcohol hangover. Read More >>

science
Nanoparticles in Consumer Products Could Be Damaging Your DNA

Masses of products—from cosmetics to clothing—now contain nanoparticles, to kill microbes, lengthen shelf life or provide other wonderful properties. But new research from MIT and Harvard suggests they could also be damaging your DNA. Read More >>

science
First Ever Lab-Grown Muscle That Can Heal Itself in Living Creatures

Anyone who's ever torn a muscle will be grateful for that fact that the fibres can repair themselves. But now, researchers have developed lab-grown muscle that can achieve the exact same thing. Read More >>

medicine
Train for Surgery Using Immersive 3D Holograms of Corpses

Computer-generated models are starting to let researchers and students peer into the body without needing a real human stretched out before them. Virtual dissection tables have been built at places like Stanford and the University of Calgary. Now, University of Michigan computer scientists and biologists have taken the technology another step forward, using projectors, joysticks and 3D equipment to build a floating holographic human that users can dissect, manipulate, and put back together as they wish. Read More >>

science
Do Colour Blind People See More Colours When They Take Hallucinogens?

If you gave a colour blind person something like LSD or some other sort of hallucinogenic drug, would they see colours they couldn't before? Read More >>

science
The Most Painful Places to Get Stung by a Bee

You've probably got a bee sting at some point in your life, but have you ever had a bee sting on your testicles? Well, one Cornell grad did, and it sent him off on a journey to find out once and for all the worst places on your body to get stung by a bee. And he decided to test the whole thing out... on himself. Read More >>

science
Tomorrow's Cancer-Blasting Wonder Drug Could Come From a Tobacco Plant

Australian researchers published findings this week on a newly-discovered plant compound that destroys cancer cells, but leaves healthy cells unharmed. They found it in possibly the last place you'd look for a cancer cure: the family of plants that brings us cancer's number-one culprit, tobacco. Read More >>

medicine
During a Transplant Does the Donor’s DNA Integrate Into the Host?

Depending on the type of donation, the DNA stays for a short time, a long while—or maybe even forever. Read More >>

image cache
The First Detailed Map of a Mammal's Neural Network

If this looks like an incredibly complex wiring diagram to you, it's because it is essentially that: you're looking at the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas, the first detailed map of any mammal's neural network. Read More >>

drugs
Psychedelic Happy Drugs in "May Beat Depression" Shock

Some scientists have been mucking about with the brains of depressed people, merrily feeding them notorious animal tranquilliser and mind-bending floaty/paralysis party drug ketamine to see what happens. Rather unsurprisingly, they felt a bit better about themselves after emerging from their medically induced k-holes. Read More >>

science
Mosquito Matchmaker: An Inside (Itchy) Look at Force-Mating Mosquitoes

The worst thing about feeding hundreds of mosquitoes on your own blood is not the itching – if you do it enough times, your body gets used to the bites. It's not even the pain, although it is always painful since the mosquitoes will use their snouts to root about your flesh in search of a blood vessel. Read More >>

science
Exploding Head Syndrome is a Real Thing

Jarred awakes from a sound sleep by a "shotgun blast, a thunderclap . . . the clash of symbols, a lightning strike or the sound of every door in the house slamming." As with others who have his condition, sufferers of exploding head syndrome (EHS) wake terrified, only to realise the noise was just a figment of their imaginations. Read More >>

collection
22 Strange Medical Instruments From the Past

In the history of medicine, machines became crucial parts of the diagnostic and treatment process in the first half of the 20th century. Scientists and doctors experimented with some really strange devices, and they developed a lot of creepy-looking health equipment—at least some of which seems almost horrific, seen through the eyes of today. The following 22 instruments are partly scary, partly weird, and partly awesome—just as inventions should be. Read More >>

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