science
Do Colour Blind People See More Colours When They Take Hallucinogens?

If you gave a colour blind person something like LSD or some other sort of hallucinogenic drug, would they see colours they couldn't before? Read More >>

science
The Most Painful Places to Get Stung by a Bee

You've probably got a bee sting at some point in your life, but have you ever had a bee sting on your testicles? Well, one Cornell grad did, and it sent him off on a journey to find out once and for all the worst places on your body to get stung by a bee. And he decided to test the whole thing out... on himself. Read More >>

science
Tomorrow's Cancer-Blasting Wonder Drug Could Come From a Tobacco Plant

Australian researchers published findings this week on a newly-discovered plant compound that destroys cancer cells, but leaves healthy cells unharmed. They found it in possibly the last place you'd look for a cancer cure: the family of plants that brings us cancer's number-one culprit, tobacco. Read More >>

medicine
During a Transplant Does the Donor’s DNA Integrate Into the Host?

Depending on the type of donation, the DNA stays for a short time, a long while—or maybe even forever. Read More >>

image cache
The First Detailed Map of a Mammal's Neural Network

If this looks like an incredibly complex wiring diagram to you, it's because it is essentially that: you're looking at the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas, the first detailed map of any mammal's neural network. Read More >>

drugs
Psychedelic Happy Drugs in "May Beat Depression" Shock

Some scientists have been mucking about with the brains of depressed people, merrily feeding them notorious animal tranquilliser and mind-bending floaty/paralysis party drug ketamine to see what happens. Rather unsurprisingly, they felt a bit better about themselves after emerging from their medically induced k-holes. Read More >>

science
Mosquito Matchmaker: An Inside (Itchy) Look at Force-Mating Mosquitoes

The worst thing about feeding hundreds of mosquitoes on your own blood is not the itching – if you do it enough times, your body gets used to the bites. It's not even the pain, although it is always painful since the mosquitoes will use their snouts to root about your flesh in search of a blood vessel. Read More >>

science
Exploding Head Syndrome is a Real Thing

Jarred awakes from a sound sleep by a "shotgun blast, a thunderclap . . . the clash of symbols, a lightning strike or the sound of every door in the house slamming." As with others who have his condition, sufferers of exploding head syndrome (EHS) wake terrified, only to realise the noise was just a figment of their imaginations. Read More >>

collection
22 Strange Medical Instruments From the Past

In the history of medicine, machines became crucial parts of the diagnostic and treatment process in the first half of the 20th century. Scientists and doctors experimented with some really strange devices, and they developed a lot of creepy-looking health equipment—at least some of which seems almost horrific, seen through the eyes of today. The following 22 instruments are partly scary, partly weird, and partly awesome—just as inventions should be. Read More >>

mars
The Human Heart May Not be Able to Handle a Trip to Mars

Anyone dreaming of casting off the shackles of Earth for the microgravity wasteland of Mars is in for some (more) bad news. In addition to a host of other problems, the necessary 18-month spaceflight would, apparently, lead to one very unhealthy (and spherical) astronaut heart. Read More >>

health
Why are Vitamins Named Using the Alphabet?

Easily identifiable by simple terms, the vitamins we recognise today were only recently isolated, identified and named. Read More >>

science
The Spray-on Surgical Film That Could Make Stiches Redundant

Surgeries, major or minor, virtually always require stitches—but they can prove uncomfortable and painful, or even become infected. Now, a spray-on film of biodegradable polymer nanofibres could replace them for good. Read More >>

watch this
The Incredible Moment When a Deaf Woman Hears for the First Time

Joanne Milne has not heard a single word, bird chirp or music note for 39 years. Four weeks ago, she got electronic cochlear implants. This is the exact moment when she hears for the first time and starts to cry overwhelmed by the feeling and emotion. Read More >>

science
Doctors are About to Start Human Trials for Suspended Animation

After years of sci-fi-inspired fantasies about the technique, a team of doctors in Pittsburgh are finally ready to start testing out a procedure that involves putting patients in a state of "suspended animation" while they repair their injuries. Put bluntly, they're going to kill people and bring them back to life. Read More >>

science
This Amazing Flexible Heart Cover Could Replace Pacemakers for Good

This amazing 3D piece of silicone dotted with electronics looks like something out of the future—because it is. In fact, this potential pacemaker replacement fits over the human heart and is capable of monitoring and, soon, responding to, its vital signs. Read More >>

3d printing
Watch a Woman Get a New 3D-Printed Skull

It's not news that we can 3D print bones or even successfully implant 3D-printed skull fragments. But a team of Dutch brain surgeons has taken things to the next level by replacing the bulk of a woman's skull with a 3D-printed dome. It's a little bit gnarly to watch. Read More >>

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