drugs
Even "Casual" Marijuana Use Can Knacker Bits of Your Brain

The latest bit of research into smoking things bought off men in car parks and betting shops is in, with medics suggesting that even a once or twice a week dope habit can cause "abnormalities" in memory abilities. Read More >>

storage
This MicroSD Card Packs Massive Capacity into a Minute Form Factor

At the company's Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, SanDisk announced the single largest-capacity MicroSD card ever created. This tiny storage medium offers an unprecedented 128GB of space, but don't expect it to come cheap. Read More >>

In Association With SONY
smartphones
How Much Memory Does Your Smartphone Actually Give You?

The dirty little not-so-secret of smartphones is that you'll never get the full amount of memory marked on the case. Operating systems take up space! But different phones leave you with different amounts of storage. Here, from Which?, are the most and least generous. Read More >>

science
Two Espressos Enhance Your Long-Term Memory

Many of us would he hard-pressed to function without our morning coffee, but now there's compelling evidence that it could help enhance your long-term memory. Read More >>

hacking
SD Cards Are Tiny, Hackable Computers (For Good or Evil)

An SD card isn't just a dumb chunk of memory; it's a dumb chunk of memory with a built-in brain, a microcontroller. And at this year's Chaos Computer Congress, enterprising hackers showed off exactly what those brains can be used for: cheap hardware for makers or malware machines for malcontents. Read More >>

samsung
Samsung Teasing Future Smartphones With 4GB of RAM

That boring square thing up there is your gateway to enhanced mobile phone fun, in the form of Samsung's new 8Gb LPDDR4 RAM chip. It's a one gigabit memory chip, but designed to be whacked into phones and tablets in groups of four. Hence a Galaxy S5 or similar with 4GB of RAM might be your next fantasy hardware buy. Read More >>

science
Finally, a Real-Life Memory-Erasing Technique for Humans

Get your Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind references ready, because scientists have just figured out a way to erase bad memories using—you guessed it—electroshock therapy. Get ready for on-demand forgetting. It's a real thing now. Read More >>

science
This Algorithm Can Make Pictures of Your Face More Memorable

We all know somebody with one of those faces. You know, the friend who always gets mistaken for someone else. They say, "I know I remember you from somewhere!" But they don't. Turns out there's a science to this sort of thing—and it could make your face more memorable. Read More >>

computers
"World's Smallest" USB Stick Squeezes 64GB into a Tiny Silvery Peanut

This tiny USB stick is the K'1, a miniature USB 3.0 dongle designed to be left permanently plugged into your sleek ultrabook or clunky old laptop to compliment its groaning onboard storage space. You won't notice it's there. Or snap it off. Read More >>

science
From the Inside Out: Everything You Need to Know About Mind Control

The term “mind control” conjures up visions of someone manipulating people from the outside, such as an evil, brainwashing scientist or a supernatural being that takes dominion of a person just with the power of his mind. But since people don’t experience this in their daily lives, most don’t believe in mind control, and think of it as just a fantasy, suitable only for books, games and movies. Read More >>

science
Scientists Have Found the Gene That Helps Us Forget

You know that scene in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind when they're scanning through Jim Carrey's Play Doh-faced head, looking for bad memories to erase? A bunch of eggheads from MIT just figured out how to do that for real! Sort of. In all seriousness, though, the discovery is poised to do a lot of good for sufferers of post-traumatic stress disorder. Read More >>

xbox one
Developers Say Xbox One is "Weaker" and Slower than PS4 in Critical Areas

The unseemly power struggle that's currently being waged between the Xbox One and PS4 camps has taken a turn for the worse for Microsoft, with developers claiming key areas of the Xbox One hardware are up to 50 per cent slower than PS4's internals. Read More >>

storage
Leave-In Compact SD Cards Boost Your MacBook's Storage Capacity

The MacBook Air's incredibly thin form factor is made possible largely in part by its use of a solid-state drive — or SSD — instead of a more traditional and thicker hard drive with moving parts. The downside is that SSDs are still considerably smaller in capacity than traditional hard drives, but PNY now has an easy way to boost your MBA's storage by taking advantage of the laptop's integrated SD card slot. Read More >>

gaming
PS4 May Reserve 3GB of RAM for the OS, Leaving Devs with 5GB to Play With

Some technical specs covering the PS4's memory allocation have been causing the usual massive, angry internet controversy, with gamers left in bewildered, directionless uproar over news that PS4's 8GB of RAM could leave just 4.5 - 5GB for games once the OS has taken a chunk out of it. Read More >>

science
Have You Noticed Your Brain Melting Since You Got a Smartphone?

If you have, you might be suffering from what's known as "Digital Dementia," a new phrase coined by researchers to describe the changes in the brain brought about from never having to remember anything thanks to always having Google and Wikipedia in your pocket. Read More >>

storage
It's About Time a Compact Flash Card Had Built-In RAID

Perfect for DSLR photographers who have to shoot for a while before they're able to back their shots up to a PC, a Japanese company called Amulet has developed a 64GB compact flash card that can function as a RAID. So it essentially gives you 32GB of storage, and the peace of mind that your shots are—in a manner of speaking—backed up.
According to Amulet's website, by redundantly writing your data to two different areas of the card at the same time, there's considerably less risk of losing your photos if there's a random write error. However, should you lose the card, or if it becomes physically damaged, then both copies of your data are kaput, so think of this more as an in-the-field backup option, than a permanent one. Read More >>

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