science
Scientists Revive Moss That Was Encased in Ice for 1,500 Years

Cryonics enthusiasts will be pleased to hear that scientists have demonstrated the ability to revive frozen life not just after a couple years or even a couple of decades. They can bring something back to life that's been frozen for fifteen centuries. The previous record was just 20 years. Read More >>

batteries
Moss-Covered Table Uses Photosynthesis to Power an FM Radio

As an electricity source, what could be greener than plants? That's the idea behind this rig, the world's first system that powers an FM radio using nothing more than the photosynthetic powers of moss. And creators Fabienne Felder and Dr. Paolo Bombelli are just getting started. Read More >>

toys
Hands On the MOSS Robotic Building Toy: A Kickstarter That Delivers

If the phrase 'caveat emptor' (aka buyer beware) applies to anything, it's Kickstarter and other crowdfunded products. Wonderful things are promised by optimistic designers, inventors, and marketers, but rarely are they delivered. That's not the case with Modular Robotics' new MOSS robotic building toy, however. Having already successfully brought its Cubelets to market, the company has created a new kind of building toy that will appeal to both kids and engineers alike. Read More >>

art
What Our Gadgets Will Look Like a 100 Years From Now

Some objects age gracefully. Think the design of products from 1960's era Braun. Or some of Apple's stuff. But that's just the design that stays timeless, the actual object gets beat up by both Father Time, Mother Nature and Careless Human. It's going to be rare to see a mint condition iPod a hundred years from now, just like it's rare to see something pristine from before World War I. Artist Maico Akiba imagined what our gadgets would look like a 100 years from now and boy do they take a beating. Read More >>

art
Ethical Graffiti: Pressure-Washing Moss to Make Art

Most street artists add to the urban environment to make a statement. But Stefaan de Croock takes away instead: he uses a pressure washer to carve graffiti into the natural dirt and growth that cover our cityscapes, and the results are quite amazing. Read More >>

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