monster machines
OSIRIS-REx Wants to Lasso an Asteroid to Explain Life on Earth

NASA has a plan to better explore how our own local star system, and life within it, got started. It wants to intercept, study, and sample a passing asteroid. The only thing more impressive than this mission's astronomical level of precision is how the space agency somehow shoehorned "Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer" into a functional acronym. Read More >>

aircraft
They May Look Like Toys but This is NASA's Amazing Aeroplane Collection

Look at this amazing collection of aeroplanes from NASA. It's so cool that you may think it's fake, like some kid put all his toys on the sidewalk. But no, they are all real. They use them for testing. Read More >>

space
Astronauts Will Grow Their Own Food (or Weed?) for the First Time Ever

NASA is sending a really cool garden to the International Space Station on April 14, on board the SpaceX Dragon. For the first time in history, astronauts will grow their own food in space using this groovy disco box, an important step towards future long-term space travel and extraterrestrial colonies. Incidentally, this must be great to cultivate weed. Read More >>

space
Buying Pieces of the Space Race at Bonhams' Space History Auction

This week, Bonhams hosted an auction of historical space items in Manhattan. The Space History Sale featured troves of objects and documents, both American and Soviet, dating back to the heyday of the space race.  Gizmodo got the chance to take a peek. Read More >>

space
Bacon Was the First Thing Ever Eaten on the Moon

Setting foot on the moon for the first time was perhaps one of the biggest technological, scientific and political achievements of our age. So what better way to celebrate, after exploring that new lunar landscape, than with bacon? Read More >>

space
Hey Look, a Weird Bright Light Was Spotted on Mars

Do you see it? There's a little beacon of light in the photograph of Mars above. It's on the left side of the photo and it's pretty darn bright. What could it be? More importantly, what do we want it to be? A Martian signal keeping track of the Curiosity rover? An alien laser beam? A key to a secret portal in the universe? A superhero? Read More >>

space
This is the Largest Known Galaxy Cluster in the Distant Universe

You're looking at ACT-CL J0102-4915. To it's stargazing buddies, though, it's better known as El Gordo—literally, "the fat one"—because it's the largest known galaxy cluster in the distant universe. Read More >>

science
NASA's About to Release a Mother Lode of Free Software

If you've been thinking about getting started on the rocket project that's been on your mind for ages, now is a good time to get serious. Next week, NASA will release a massive software catalogue with over 1,000 projects. It's not the first time the space agency's released code, but it is the first time they've made it so easy. Read More >>

space
NASA Finds Water Ocean Inside Saturn Moon

NASA has found a subterranean ocean in Enceladus, "a large underground ocean of liquid water." According to the space agency, this may be a potential home to extraterrestrial life. Enceladus was out of the list of potential life harbours in the solar system until now, the other major candidates being Titan and Europa. Read More >>

space
Report: NASA Cuts all Non-ISS Ties with Russia Over Ukraine

In an internal memo, NASA has stated that it will suspend all interaction with the Russian government, in response to Russia's violations of Ukraine's territorial independence. Fortunately for US astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson, both currently orbiting on the International Space Station, the two agencies will still cooperate to transport supplies and personnel to and from the ISS. Read More >>

mars
The Human Heart May Not be Able to Handle a Trip to Mars

Anyone dreaming of casting off the shackles of Earth for the microgravity wasteland of Mars is in for some (more) bad news. In addition to a host of other problems, the necessary 18-month spaceflight would, apparently, lead to one very unhealthy (and spherical) astronaut heart. Read More >>

environment
The US Grows the Most Productive Plants in the World, Says NASA

Remember learning about America's "amber waves of grain?" Probably not, you're from the UK, but over yonder it's a lyric from a well known patriotic song. As it turns out that the United States' bread basket—a.k.a., the Corn Belt—is even more productive than previously thought. In fact, during its growing season, it's the most productive land on Earth, according to new NASA data. Read More >>

monster machines
This Super-Sized Cargo Plane Carries NASA's Biggest Loads

When NASA needs to ship its outsized spacecraft components between production, testing, and launch facilities around the country, there is only one plane big enough, powerful enough, and—most importantly—wide enough to do the job: the Aero Spacelines Super Guppy. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook's Drone-and-Laser Plan to Give Internet to Everyone

In its quest to get the whole world online, Facebook's Internet.org project has included partnerships with companies like Samsung and Nokia, as well as with NASA. Now it seems that rumors about Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook drone dreams are true, and the social network giant is planning on internet-delivering drones, satellites, and even lasers. Here's our first look at how that might take shape. Read More >>

watch this
How NASA Will Assemble and Launch its New Manned Space Fleet

NASA has finalised the "the initial design and technology development phase for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Programme" that will build and launch their new manned spacecraft fleet. They made a fascinating technical video that shows how they will assemble and launch "different spacecraft and rockets in development for human exploration." Read More >>

space
Being a Celebrity Astronaut is Tougher Than it Sounds

For a brief period in the American saga, the astronaut was the man of the moment. No profession commanded as much awe and admiration. Widely regarded as the personification of all that was best in the country, the first astronauts were blanketed with the adulation usually accorded star quarterbacks, war heroes, and charismatic movie stars. Yet this was never part of NASA's agenda. Read More >>

Login
X

Don't have a Gizmodo UK account?