science
Scientists Say They've Created Artificial Blood for Humans

Somebody ring the bell at the blood factory, because it's almost time to get those assembly lines running. Almost. A team of British scientists say they've created red blood cells suitable for transfusion into humans, a breakthrough that could change the lives of millions—if it works. Read More >>

research
Cutting-Edge Cancer Research: Cannibalism, Zombies & Suicidal Cells

Cancer research is tough stuff—but it's also surprisingly gruesome, too. This Sci Show video explains how the latest insights into curing the disease include cannibalism, zombies and suicidal cells. Read More >>

research
The Perfect Male and Female Bodies, According to Males and Females

If you ask men and women what they think the perfect body is, you're going to get two very different answers. It's fascinating, really. UK lingerie company Bluebella surveyed men and women on the "perfect" man and woman using celebrity features and came up with these bodies. Read More >>

science
Science Determines Which Dance Moves Will Help You Impress the Ladies

There's one thing that has been universally regarded as a woman-pleaser throughout history. Minds out of the gutter please, I'm talking about dancing. It turns out sciencey people have done extensive research into the topic, and have discovered which dance moves men can pull off to maximise the number of impressed females in the vicinity. Read More >>

research
Scientists Manipulate Genes to Make Old Organs Young Again (in Mice)

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh showed this week that they could teach an old mouse's thymus to bounce back to a healthy, youthful state, simply by manipulating a single protein that controls gene expression. It's the first time scientists have been able to regenerate a living organ by gene manipulation, and it could have huge implications in health science. Read More >>

science
Self-Destructing Electronics are Here and They are Awesome

A renegade professor and his team at Iowa State just unveiled a mind-bending new technology. Put bluntly, they've created self-destructing electronics: gadgets that disappear with the flip of a switch. And, yes, it's just like Mission Impossible. Read More >>

science
Bad News: E-Cigs Alter Cells a Lot Like Tobacco Does

A new cancer study brings more bad news to the e-cigarette industry. Scientists exposed human bronchial cells to e-cig vapour and found that it altered the cells in a way not dissimilar to tobacco. In other words, that delicious, seemingly risk-free nicotine vapour might not be so benign, after all. Read More >>

science
Tomorrow's Cancer-Blasting Wonder Drug Could Come From a Tobacco Plant

Australian researchers published findings this week on a newly-discovered plant compound that destroys cancer cells, but leaves healthy cells unharmed. They found it in possibly the last place you'd look for a cancer cure: the family of plants that brings us cancer's number-one culprit, tobacco. Read More >>

science
Stem Cell Researchers Just Figured Out How to Create New Embryos

A team of researchers from the University of Virginia just made scientific history: They figured out how to turn stem cells into full blown fish embryos. In other words, scientists can now control embryonic development, a key to being able to grow organs and even entire organism from stem cells. Read More >>

science
Researchers Found a New, Easy Way to Turn Graphite Into Diamond

Since graphite—the dark material used in regular old pencils—and diamonds are both made from carbon, it's technically feasible to turn the former into the latter. You just need to apply a little pressure—about 150,000 times what the atmosphere on Earth's surface is like. But researchers at Stanford University claim to have found a shortcut. Read More >>

research
Scientists Cured Paralysis in Mice with Stem Cells and Lasers

This is wild. Chasing the elusive dream of curing paralysis, a team of scientists used stem cells and optogenetics to circumvent the central motor system of lab mice whose nerves had been cut. This enabled them to blast individual motor neurons with a laser, triggering movement in the legs of the mice. Read More >>

science
Mosquito Matchmaker: An Inside (Itchy) Look at Force-Mating Mosquitoes

The worst thing about feeding hundreds of mosquitoes on your own blood is not the itching – if you do it enough times, your body gets used to the bites. It's not even the pain, although it is always painful since the mosquitoes will use their snouts to root about your flesh in search of a blood vessel. Read More >>

environment
Hypnotic Flapping Wing Turbines Keep Working in the Gentlest Breeze

There have been many proposed alternatives to the spinning propeller blades used on wind turbines installed all over the county, but none as unorthodox as Festo's new DualWingGenerator. Inspired by the company's work on winged flying robots, the design keeps working when winds are as slow as nine miles per hour. Read More >>

research
Some Men Really are as Stupid as They Look

Researchers have found that it's possible to guesstimate how clever or stupid a man may be by looking at his face, with a fairly strong correlation existing between how intelligent a man appears to be and his actual brain power. But the same doesn't work for the more mysterious faces of the ladies. Read More >>

science
Hearing Trick Convinces People Their Arms are Made of Stone

If your arm falls asleep for a while, it can sort of feel like it's made of rubber. But how do you make your arm feel like it's made of marble? According to Italian researchers, all you need is the sound of a hammer tapping stone. And some psychological trickery. Read More >>

bicycles
You Can't Steer a Bike in Zero Gravity, Even if the Road's Magnetic

Gravity is the sworn enemy of any cyclist. Succumb to its force while you're on two wheels, and you'll end up bloody and bruised. But like any superhero's nemesis, gravity justifies a bike's very existence, because without it, you'd never be able to steer. Strap on a helmet, this is gonna get weird. Read More >>

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