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The Fifth Element Game That Sadly Never Was

You probably don't remember The Fifth Element game for Playstation because it was so crappy. And you don't remember this 8-bit The Fifth Element game because, sadly, it never existed. It's just a video made by those jerks at CineFix, who keep taunting us with awesome but fake retro game remakes of classic movies. Read More >>

retromodo
Kids Reacting to an Old Cassette Walkman is Wonderful and Horrifying

Originally marketed in 1979, the first Sony Walkman turns 35 this year, and it's about as outmoded as a technology can be these days. That's why it's understandable that the kids in this delightful video, none of whom were even alive in the '90s, have no idea how to use the thing. Or what it's for. They can't even conceive a world in which a Walkman is useful. Read More >>

retromodo
This 1920s 'Taste Organ' Was Like a Symphony for Your Mouth

Think of it like music, but for your taste buds. Confused? Well, the people in this illustration from 1926 probably were too. Read More >>

humour
Are 1995's Internet Etiquette Rules Still Even Remotely Relevant?

Like most people, I enjoy spending my evenings reading twenty-year-old articles about the internet. One of my favourites is about 'netiquette'-- a list of internet politeness rules. They just didn't see Twitter coming. Read More >>

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This Guy Made Electronica Music Using MS-DOS

Because anyone can create music with access to a laptop these days, Diode Milliampere decided to up the ante and make it harder for himself by making a song using MS-DOS. Yes, that command line inputting, C-drive accessing MS-DOS from 30 years ago. It turned out alright! Read More >>

retromodo
This Amiga 500 Emulator is So Awesome

If you're tired of modern computing, how about mucking around with an Amiga 500 instead? Thanks to Google developer Christian Stefansen you can do just that, and it's awesome. Read More >>

retromodo
The First Watch to Climb Mount Everest

As a watch is handed down from generation to generation, the stories behind its life make it more and more valuable. And as far as past lives go, this Rolex, currently on display at the Beyer Watch and Clock Museum in Zürich, Switzerland, could top them all. It accompanied Sir Edmund Hillary on one of the most famous expeditions of all time—to the top of the world. Read More >>

retromodo
Moments Lost: A Blade Runner Tribute That's More Than a Replicant

Blade Runner is more than a cult classic: it's an icon, the modern definition of dystopian future-noir. Its visual, auditory and narrative complexity remain striking more than 30 years after its debut. Now, a Swedish group of artists, musicians and writers seeks to create an entire experience inspired by the seminal movie, with help from Indiegogo. Read More >>

monster machines
This Aluminium Mecha Taught Apollo Astronauts How to Land on the Moon

In the early 1960s, when the Apollo missions were underway and America was hellbent on reaching the moon, NASA researchers faced a nearly endless litany of technical hurdles and engineering obstacles nobody had even dreamed of up to that point. Chief among them: Once you shoot three guys across 384,472 kilometres across space at an orbiting body with just a fraction of the mass of Earth, how do you put them safely on the surface? That answer: lots and lots of practice in this gangly hardware simulator. Read More >>

retromodo
Look at the Insane Number Layouts Our Telephones Could Have Had

The year was 1960, and phones were changing. It was the beginning of the end for rotary dialing, and buttons were the future. But engineers faced an important, looming question: what order do you put those buttons in? Read More >>

retromodo
What the Same Train Ride Looked Like in 1953, 1983 and 2013

We're all alive right now to know what 2013 is like. Some of us can tell stories about life 30 years ago. But most of us have no clue what life was like 60 years ago. This fantastic video by the BBC compares that whole timespan. It shows the same exact train ride filmed in 1953, 1983 and 2013, to reveal the difference of 60 years. Read More >>

retromodo
The Invisible Radar Force Field That Saved Great Britain

When you think about World War II tech, chances are your mind leaps right to the atomic bomb. But there was another less explosive tech that completely changed the defensive game: Radar. And this map outlines exactly how it saved Great Britain. Read More >>

retromodo
A Melodious Mashup of Nearly Every Chime and Bleep in Tech History

Close your eyes at any given moment, and you're likely to hear an audio artifact or two — whether the boo-dah-ling of a text message or the clacking of a keyboard. But as this new sound collage reminds us, hundreds of once-familiar audio cues are now doomed to obscurity, thanks to technology's forward march. Read More >>

collection
16 Classic Films that Got Future Tech Right

You can yell, "Beam me up, Scotty!" all you want, the only thing that will happen is you'll elicit a bunch of bemused stares from passersby wondering if you've bonked your head recently. The sad fact is human teleportation devices don't yet exist in 2013, and even if they did, the tremendous lag would make it extraordinarily impractical. Such is the reality of science that it doesn't always mesh with our fantastic visions of fictional futures filled with flying cars and other implausible technologies. In other words, reality sucks compared to what we've grown up watching on television. Read More >>

history
This 700-Year-Old Ring Was Used to Poison Kings

Should you have happened to find yourself dining with Bulgarian royalty 700 years ago and the wine tasted a bit off, you would have been smart to put the goblet down. Bulgarian archaeologists have just discovered a medieval bronze ring explicitly designed to poison political foes — in the most discreet way possible. Read More >>

retromodo
How Underwater Drones Are Searching For the Lost Pilots of WWII

Deep below the pacific ocean, dozens of WWII pilots are laying in watery graves, still inside the aircraft took them across the sky decades ago. It's far to late for a rescue, but as Popular Science explains, the people behind the BentProp Project—and their undersea drones—are surfacing these soldiers' incredible history. Read More >>

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