design
Glow-in-the-Dark Roads Finally Exist Outside of Hot Wheels

The concept of glow-in-the-dark roads is an incredibly simple piece of safety infrastructure that feels like it should have been implemented years ago. Finally, it has been—on the roads of the Netherlands Read More >>

apps
This Game Might Actually Get You to Learn In-Flight Safety Procedures

Unless you're a first-time passenger who's a little anxious about flying, you probably pay more attention to your phone than a flight attendant's safety spiel. But since it really is important to pay attention, researchers from the University of Udine's HCI Lab are developing smartphone and tablet apps that gamify in-flight safety info. Read More >>

gadgets
Volvo's Inflatable Child Seat Concept Fits in a Backpack

At one time the military actually tried to develop inflatable planes that were strong enough to fly, but easy to transport. Those never materialised, but the technology involved—a drop-stitch fabric that can be inflated to very high pressures—has enabled Volvo to create an inflatable child car seat that's just as safe as everything already on the market. Read More >>

sony
Sony Recalling 26,000 Vaios as Old Battery Fire Worries Return

Owners of the Sony VAIO Fit 11A are apparently being contacted by Sony, over concerns that the batteries inside may pose a fire risk. Some 26,000 Vaio models are affected, with the Panasonic-made batteries implicated in three cases of overheating and users receiving burns as a result. A return & replace scheme will be put in place soon. [WSJ via The Verge] Read More >>

cars
Petrol-Sniffing Spider Forces Mazda into Recall and Real-World Bug-Fix

A bizarre case of spider infestation has forced car-maker Mazda to recall 42,000 Mazda 6 models for a software update, one designed to counteract the fact that a certain variety of spider is drawn to the smell of petrol and enjoys nesting in its fuel tank vent line. Read More >>

safety
Is an Airbag for Your Head Really Safer Than a Bike Helmet?

Remember Hövding, the Swedish bike helmet released a few years back that looks like a stylish, poofy collar and supposedly inflates like an airbag upon impact? In a new video, the company explains more about how it works—claiming it's actually much safer than a traditional helmet. Read More >>

watch this
High-Speed Proof of an Airbag's Violent Life-Saving Power

It's been described as getting hit with a basketball thrown point blank at your face, but if you ever experience an airbag deployment you're probably not going to complain since it most likely saved your life. Unless you're a glass of water, as this wonderful high-speed footage reveals. Read More >>

safety
There's an Airbag Hidden Inside This Lightweight Ski Jersey

Dainese has been developing a wearable airbag system that the company hopes will help save skiers from broken bones and injuries after a wipeout on the slopes. And somehow, it's managed to fit all of the hardware into a jersey that doesn't look like it adds much bulk or weight to a skier's outfit. Because after all, safety gear doesn't work if you don't want to wear it. Read More >>

safety
If You Want to be Immune to Tasers Just Wear Carbon Fibre Clothing

It's no Iron Man suit, but if you've got a knack for civil disobedience and often find yourself on the business end of a Taser, the folks at Hackaday discovered that carbon fibre clothing can actually let you shrug off those electric shocks. Read More >>

science
Pipe Crawling Underwater X-Ray Machines Find Leaks Before They Happen

They say an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, but when it comes to an underwater pipeline carrying oil or natural gas, staying ahead of leaks can actually help prevent billions in cleanup costs. So researchers at GE are developing an underwater submersible that uses X-rays to check pipelines for signs of corrosion and deterioration before something catastrophic happens. Read More >>

airplanes
Why Don’t Commercial Airplanes Have Parachutes for Passengers?

Seatbelts and airbags in cars save passengers lives. Parachutes save people who, for a variety of reasons, exit a plane in mid-flight. So why aren't parachutes provided to passengers on commercial airline flights, in case of emergencies?
Because they almost certainly would not save anyone's life.
  Read More >>

safety
How to Survive a Skyscraper Fire

A man died trying to escape a fire in his high-rise apartment building in Manhattan earlier this month. What makes this all the more tragic is that he would have survived—if he had only stayed in his apartment. Skyscrapers are designed to contain fires, so that, even when you're hearing alarms and smelling smoke, the safest thing to do is to ignore every instinct to flee and stay put. Read More >>

safety
Reusable Airbag Backpack Helps Keep You Alive in an Avalanche (Or Two)

Compared to car airbags that need to inflate immediately, the airbags that skiers wear to avoid being buried in an avalanche don't necessarily need to inflate as fast. So Black Diamond's new JetForce backpack uses a fan instead of compressed air which means not only can you try it out beforehand, it's also cheap and easy to reset. Read More >>

bikes
This Laser Bike Light is Like a Bat Signal for Cyclists

Cyclists can adorn themselves from head to toe in flashing lights, but it's still possible that pedestrians and drivers won't see them until it's too late. It's a problem the Blaze Laserlight hopes to solve by projecting an early warning signal four to six metres ahead of a cyclist, so that others on the road will know they're coming in advance—and have time to react. Read More >>

science
Carbon Nanotubes Can Now Fireproof Your Furniture

If you've ever lamented the fact that putting your sofa right next to a warm crackling fireplace was dangerous, carbon nanotubes might one day come to the rescue—again. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology—or NIST—have created a carbon nanotube-based coating that makes the foam used in furniture considerably less flammable. Read More >>

transport
Met Police Issued 14,000 Fines to Cyclists and Drivers in Eight Weeks

In an operation that lasted two months, London Metropolitan Police swarmed the capital in an attempt to increase safety on the roads, handing out over 14,000 fixed penalty notices in the process to those on both two wheel and four. Read More >>

Login
X

Don't have a Gizmodo UK account?