science
Science Determines Which Dance Moves Will Help You Impress the Ladies

There's one thing that has been universally regarded as a woman-pleaser throughout history. Minds out of the gutter please, I'm talking about dancing. It turns out sciencey people have done extensive research into the topic, and have discovered which dance moves men can pull off to maximise the number of impressed females in the vicinity. Read More >>

happy hour
Eight of the World's Most Phenomenally Nerdy Beers

Beer might come with some pretty brotastic connotations, but as with everything else in life, it's the nerds who really do it right. Because when the same passion that gave us NASA and Lord of the Rings is applied to booze, the results are phenomenal, delicious, and (most importantly) geeky as hell. Read More >>

science
Can Lasers Protect Buildings From Lightning?

The standard advice authorities offer when lightning starts crackling across the sky is for people to take shelter inside buildings. Through lightning rods affixed to the roof, electrical wiring, and plumbing that can direct the electricity away from occupants and into the ground, substantial structures offer protection. Read More >>

science
The Plan to Turn Jellyfish Into Nappies and Paper Towels

Of the many problems on Earth, here are two: there are too many jellyfish in the sea, and there are too many nappies in our landfills. An Israeli nanotech start-up called Cine'al says it has found the answer to both in Hydromash, a super-absorbent material made from the bodies of jellyfish. But why stop at nappies? Cine'al says jellyfish tampons, paper towels, and medical sponges could all be part of our absorbent future. Read More >>

art
Is Maths an Artform?

Sometimes the results of maths are sure beautiful—pretty charts, say, or wonderful visualisations. But can maths itself, those long complex equations, be an artform too? Read More >>

environment
Do Cow Farts Actually Contribute to Global Warming?

There are currently approximately 1.3 to 1.5 billion cows grazing, sleeping, and chewing their cud at any given time on planet Earth. And these 590-kilo (average weight for both a beef and dairy cow) animals eat a lot. Much like humans, when they eat, gas builds up inside of their guts and has to be expelled. (See Why Beans Make You Fart) Cows fart and burp… a lot. The result is a large amount of methane being introduced into the atmosphere. Read More >>

science
Views of a Dark World: Illuminating Unseen Infrastructure

For a global society highly dependent on complex technical, economic, and political systems, we manage to carry on our daily routines largely unaware of the hard and soft infrastructure—from pipes to policies—on which these systems rest. That is, until unexpected events, so-called black swans, illuminate the previously hidden pieces and surprise or unsettle us by their presence and function. Read More >>

science
The Large Hadron Collider Has Found a New Particle Unlike Any Other Form of Matter

Not content with perhaps the biggest scientific discovery of the decade, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider continue to search for new particles—- and now they've found one that seems to be an entirely new form of matter. Read More >>

science
Doctors Can Now Grow Engineered Vaginas in Women

After decades of work, a team of doctors say they've successfully engineered vaginas that have been implanted and grown in women. The vaginas were grown in a lab from the female patients' own cells and later transferred to their bodies, where they formed into normal vaginas. The breakthrough bears some huge implications, too. Read More >>

science
What Happens to Bacteria in Space?

In the otherwise barren space 220 miles above Earth's surface, a capsule of life-sustaining oxygen and water orbits at 17,000 miles per hour. You might know this capsule as the International Space Station (ISS), currently home to six humans—and untold billions of bacteria. Microbes have always followed us to the frontiers, but it's only now that scientists at NASA and elsewhere are seriously investigating what happens when we bring Earth's microbes into space. Read More >>

research
Scientists Manipulate Genes to Make Old Organs Young Again (in Mice)

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh showed this week that they could teach an old mouse's thymus to bounce back to a healthy, youthful state, simply by manipulating a single protein that controls gene expression. It's the first time scientists have been able to regenerate a living organ by gene manipulation, and it could have huge implications in health science. Read More >>

watch this
A Simple Photographic Trick Lets You See Invisible Things

The world is full of things you can't see: the heat coming off your hand, the spray of a sneeze, even the sound of two hands clapping. But a simple camera trick called Schlieren flow visualization turns those invisible waves of light into beautiful plumes of movement. With this trick you can literally see invisible things. Read More >>

medicine
This Amoeba Eats Human Intestines, Cell by Cell

It might look positively adorable in this image, but don't be fooled: this pathogen, known as Entamoeba histolytica, eats human intestines alive, cell by cell. Read More >>

science
Self-Destructing Electronics are Here and They are Awesome

A renegade professor and his team at Iowa State just unveiled a mind-bending new technology. Put bluntly, they've created self-destructing electronics: gadgets that disappear with the flip of a switch. And, yes, it's just like Mission Impossible. Read More >>

science
How These Microscopic Diamonds are Going to Shape the Future

No doubt you're already familiar with the many ways graphene promises to save us all, but there's another (so-called) miracle material out there vying for your attention—and it's sparkly, to boot. Say hello to the latest and greatest substance to kick science's ass straight into the future: the nanodiamond. Read More >>

science
Bad News: E-Cigs Alter Cells a Lot Like Tobacco Does

A new cancer study brings more bad news to the e-cigarette industry. Scientists exposed human bronchial cells to e-cig vapour and found that it altered the cells in a way not dissimilar to tobacco. In other words, that delicious, seemingly risk-free nicotine vapour might not be so benign, after all. Read More >>

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