security
Edward Snowden is a "Self-Publicising Narcissist" and is Guilty of Treason, Says Top Tory

The UK's former defence secretary Liam Fox has gone on a bit of a public rampage regarding Edward Snowden's password protected ZIP file of shame, suggesting Ed and his leaks those who published them are guilty of treason. Read More >>

security
Bill Gates's New Patent Would Keep Glassholes From Spying on Your Screens

Google's big Glass free-for-all has come and gone, but whether or not anyone actually bought the damn thing, cameras are popping up all over the place, and people are starting to get (perhaps rightfully) paranoid. Fortunately there could be tech in the future to save your screens from prying camera eyes. And Bill Gates has the patent. Read More >>

google
A Google Glass App That Helps the Watchers Watch the Watchmen

If you're committed to avoiding the gaze of the ever-growing number of cameras recording our every move, Google Glass hardly seems like a sensible purchase. That is, unless your face-computer can steer you around each camera's field of view. Enter Sander Veenhof's new Glass app, Watch Your Privacy. Now, you and your Glass can watch the watchers. Read More >>

security
Google Street View Accidentally Made an Algorithm That Cracks CAPTCHAs

House numbers on Google Street View can turn up as blobby, blurry things, so its engineers built a pretty crazy neural network to decipher them. Except this algorithm also turns out to be very very good at deciphering other blobby, blurry texts—like CAPTCHAs, which it cracks with 99 per cent accuracy. Read More >>

crime
Canadian Teen is the First Arrested for Stealing Data With Heartbleed

In what's sure to be the first of many to come, a 19-year-old Canadian man was arrested for exploiting the Heartbleed bug to lift taxpayer data from a government website, making this the first official Heartbleed-related arrest. Read More >>

smartphones
The Pledge From the Smartphone Industry That Could Stop Your Phone Being Stolen

The likes of Apple, Google, Microsoft and other major figures in the smartphone industry have signed a pledge that will make it harder to steal mobile phones—from July 2015, at least. Read More >>

android
How to Check if Your Android Device Could be Hacked via Heartbleed

Heartbleed is causing heartache on hundreds of servers all over the internet, but security researchers have also warned that the bug could allow direct hacks of Android, too. Here's how to check if your device is at risk. Read More >>

google
Google is Reading Your Emails for Your Browsing Benefit...and for Ads, of Course

Google's updated its terms of service in an effort to be a bit more transparent about its email-scanning practices.  And whether you're harbouring a deep dark secret in your Gmail sub-folders or otherwise, it inevitably comes down to one thing -- making you more valuable to advertisers. Read More >>

security
Try the Super-Secure USB Drive OS That Edward Snowden Insists on Using

We all know that Edward Snowden insists on secure email, but he's also very picky about his operating systems, too. In fact, he uses a free, super-secure version of Linux—called Tails—that fits on a USB stick and can be used on any computer without leaving a trace. Read More >>

security
Police are Testing a "Live Google Earth" to Watch Crime as it Happens

Last year in Compton, Los Angeles, police began quietly testing a system that allowed them to do something incredible: watch every car and person in real time as they ebbed and flowed around the city. Every assault, every purse snatched, every car speeding away was on record—all thanks to an Ohio company that monitors cities from the air. Read More >>

security
Oedipal Heartbleed Hackers Attack Mumsnet

Mumsnet, the parenting blog with 1.5 million registered users, has been hit by hackers exploiting the Heartbleed bug, with the site becoming the first confirmed victim of the security flaw. Read More >>

hackers
Cybersecurity as a War Against Haunted Objects

We've already covered the insane case of a Chinese restaurant menu that served as a successful point of infiltration for hackers to access the private computers of an unnamed oil company, so I won't go into much more detail. However, there was a brief moment in the original New York Times story that deserves a quick shout-out here. Read More >>

privacy
NYT: Obama Lets the NSA Exploit Some Internet Flaws

Over the weekend, it was revealed that President Obama thinks that when the National Security Agency discovers major flaws in internet security, they should be allowed to exploit it if there's a "a clear national security or law enforcement need." Read More >>

design
How a Great Logo Helped Make You Actually Care About Heartbleed

You might not understand the how Heartbleed works, but you definitely heard about it this week. And with it, that drippy, maroon, bleeding heart logo—which is part of what made the story so memorable. In fact, the way Heartbleed was presented by the team that discovered it is a model for how technology issues should be communicated to the public. Read More >>

security
How Secure are Your Favourite Websites?

Heartbleed is a scary thing. Aside from the violent-sounding name, the vulnerability in OpenSSL security protocols spans the entire internet and affects most of the sites we know, love, and use on a daily basis. Even outside of Heartbleed, not all security protocols are created equal. So how do you know who to trust? Read More >>

security
Credit Card-Reading Spy Camera Found in the NYC Subway

Credit card thieves seem to come up with a new way to steal your personal information every day. The latest ploy: a card-reading spy camera, hiding above the MetroCard machine. Read More >>

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