energy
The Floating Super-Factories Spawned by Our Insatiable Hunger For Gas

The world's ever-growing demand for gas is driving companies deeper and further into the ocean to drill for it. And, to do so, they're building a new type of ship: small city-sized floating factories that drill, process, refine, and barrel gas while still out on the open sea. Think of them as one-stop gas shops that, crucially, can operate in international waters. Read More >>

ships
QR Codes Make Themselves Useful as Warship Construction Maps

BAE Systems staff working on the new series of Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers have come up with a novel use for the poor old QR code system; sticking codes on walls of the skeletons of the ships to help engineers find their way around the massive 3D construction sites. Read More >>

transport
Why the Speed of Ships is Measured in Knots

How fast you're going while out floating on the big blue can be notoriously tricky to judge if you're just eyeballing it. One method used to get around this issue was introduced in the sixteenth century using a "chip log" or "log-line." Read More >>

drones
Rolls-Royce is Designing Giant Drone Ships to Sail the High Seas

Believe it or not, sailors are a big drag on shipping vessels. They weigh down the ship, take up space, cost thousands of pounds a day, and even cause most of the accidents at sea. So it's no surprise that Rolls-Royce's maritime division wants to replace them with robots. Read More >>

monster machines
How Russia Built a Ship Too Big to Set Sail

Designed to act as the eyes and ears of the Soviet Pacific Fleet, this massive command ship was among Russia's most ambitious Cold War constructs. Packing cutting edge electronic warfare and communications systems, this enormous ship could have become the monolithic centerpiece of Russia's navy. So why did it end up rotting away as off-shore barracks instead? Read More >>

ships
Bad Rooms on the New Royal Caribbean Ship Come With Virtual Balconies

Hey there, world traveller. Say you want to go on a cruise but can't afford a fancy oceanfront room on the Empress deck. No big deal! Royal Caribbean's got you covered. Read More >>

monster machines
How Far Can This Ship Shift Sideways? Enough to Break the Ice

Today's largest cargo ships can exceed 130 feet—in width—making any sort of passage through the arctic's ice-encrusted trade routes nearly impossible without the help of not one but two conventional icebreakers. But with just a single one of these triangular ships leading the way, even the largest container vessel can forge through ice fields with ease. Read More >>

history
The Woman Who Survived the Titanic, Britannic, and Olympic Disasters

Today I found out about Violet Jessop, "Miss Unsinkable," the woman who survived the sinking of the sister ships the Titanic and the Britannic, and was also aboard the third of the trio of Olympic class vessels, the Olympic, when it had a major accident. Read More >>

watch this
This is What it's Like to Intentionally Crash a Ship

When a ship comes to the end of its working life, it has to be torn apart, piece-by-piece, to be disposed of. By that point, though, little care needs to be taken in getting it ashore—so they're just intentionally run aground. This is what it looks like. Read More >>

monster machines
This Super Icebreaker is Heading to Antarctica to Free Two Frozen Ships – Updated

It may not be the largest or most powerful ice breaker ever to set sail (that record is held by Russia's nuclear-powered NS Yamal), but America's Polar Star is easily one of the most badass. This 75,000 horsepower ship can crush a two-storey ice wall in a single swipe of its mighty bow. Read More >>

monster machines
The Biggest Ship in the World Has Floated For the First Time

The Emma Maersk was dethroned as the world's largest seafaring vessel this morning when this ship, longer than the Empire State Building, left its dry dock in South Korea for the first time. But this town-sized ship isn't so much built for sailing as it is for pumping gas. Read More >>

monster machines
This Rolls-Royce Tanker is a School Bus for Salmon

Fresh fish tends to spoil fast, even when kept on ice. So to keep schools of farm-raised fish at the peak of freshness (read: still swimming) during their trip to shore for processing, Rolls-Royce is building the world's largest mobile aquarium. Read More >>

monster machines
America's Largest Carbon Fiber Ship is a Seafaring Speed Demon

The answer to designing ships that are both fast and stable has traditionally been to make the vessels as narrow as possible (to reduce drag) and sit them lower in the water (to reduce the buffeting effects of plowing through waves). But US Navy's M80 Stiletto is not your typical ship. Combining cutting edge construction and a unique hull design, this fast attack boat can cut through rough seas like a hot knife through drawn butter. Read More >>

drones
A Drone Hit a Guided Missile Cruiser During a Weapons System Test

The whole point of testing things is to ward off future problems, right? And the Navy has plenty to look into since a drone that was deployed as a radar test crashed into a ship during a weapons system test. Test. Testing. Test. Read More >>

security
An Iranian Oil Tanker Hacked Its Own Tracking System to Avoid Detection

Lately, we've seen how hackers can cause havoc on the high seas, but the shenanigans have been limited to security researchers for the most part. They wanted to prove that it was possible to do things like take over a ship's navigation system so that it doesn't happen in real life. Welp, too late for that now. Read More >>

hackers
Hackers Figured Out How to Hijack Shipping Vessel Tracking Systems

A team of white hat hackers recently figured out how to break into the navigation technology used to track 400,000 shipping vessels worldwide. With this kind of access they could hypothetically make it appear as if a fleet of mystery ships was about to invade New York City. This is not good. Read More >>

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