research
Scientists Manipulate Genes to Make Old Organs Young Again (in Mice)

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh showed this week that they could teach an old mouse's thymus to bounce back to a healthy, youthful state, simply by manipulating a single protein that controls gene expression. It's the first time scientists have been able to regenerate a living organ by gene manipulation, and it could have huge implications in health science. Read More >>

crime
Jackass Who Lasered Children's Hospital Chopper Gets 14-Year Sentence

Astounding moron Sergio Rodriguez got slapped with a 14-year prison sentence earlier this month, convicted of aiming a handheld laser pointer at an emergency medical helicopter delivering a young patient to the Children's Hospital of Central California. Remember folks, trying to blind pilots in the air is a very, very bad idea. Read More >>

science
Hearing Trick Convinces People Their Arms are Made of Stone

If your arm falls asleep for a while, it can sort of feel like it's made of rubber. But how do you make your arm feel like it's made of marble? According to Italian researchers, all you need is the sound of a hammer tapping stone. And some psychological trickery. Read More >>

booze
Want the Most Booze per Calorie? Skip Liquor and Go for Champagne

In surprising booze news, Wonkblog's Christopher Ingraham gives a surprising (and classy) spin to conventional drinking wisdom: if you're looking to get the most alcoholic punch per calorie, don't reach for "the hard stuff." You're better off drinking champagne or sparkling wine. Read More >>

science
Your Nose is a Super-Machine That Can Detect Over a Trillion Scents

For nearly a century, scientists assumed the human nose was capable of discerning about 10,000 different odours. Turns out, that number was missing a whole bunch of zeroes—new research shows that the human nose can detect over 1,000,000,000,000 distinct scents. Tell your dog to stop being so smug about his smelling abilities. Read More >>

chatroom
What's Your Proudest Online Accomplishment?

The internet is the place to pump your ideas out and hope they'll resonate with someone somewhere. When digital strangers agree with your opinions, fawn over your pictures, or laugh at your jokes, it feels good, man. What was your biggest internet hit? Read More >>

hacking
Hackers Can Use the Labels on Your Snail Mail to Mess You Up Online

Think hacking starts and ends online? Think again. Forbes took a look at the damage an identity thief can do using just the address label on the magazines you subscribe to, and the answer ain't pretty. Read More >>

chatroom
Do You Ever Click On In-App Advertisements?

"I'll just ignore the ads," you tell yourself whenever you choose a free app instead of paying for the no-ad version. But nobody can really ignore those ads—they're splattered all across your screen. And somebody has to be clicking on them. Is it you? You can tell us. Read More >>

science
Scientists Finally Figures Out How Pruney Fingers Work

The science world's understanding of pruney bathtub fingers is shockingly thin, especially considering every great mind the world over has probably experienced it firsthand. Finally, German physicists have uncovered the mechanism that lets your fingers go all shrivelled, then bounce right back to normal. And that understanding could revolutionise the materials we make. Read More >>

giz explains
What Tinnitus is (and What You Can do About It)

Some perceive it as a high-pitched, mosquito-like squeal; others, an incessant electrical buzzing. It can even sound like unintelligible voices or music. It's known as tinnitus, and it's a surprisingly common affliction, affecting some 50 million people in America alone. Here's why it happens, and how you can prevent it. Read More >>

olympics
In Sochi, Every Single Phone and Laptop is Definitely Getting Hacked

Say you're going to Sochi for the Winter Olympics. You've magically found a hotel that's actually complete and not full of rubbish and construction equipment. Crisis averted, right? Not quite—because as NBC Nightly News' experiment shows, your computer or smartphone could be hacked in seconds in Sochi. Hackers will be going after your computer or smartphone from the minute you land. Read More >>

chatroom
Should Students be Able to Take Coding Classes For Language Credits?

The US State of Kentucky's Senate just passed a law that will let students take computer programming classes to satisfy their foreign language requirements. Do you think that's a good move? Read More >>

medicine
Doctors Ease Peanut Allergies in Tiny Test You Shouldn't Try at Home

To a nut-allergic person, a peanut is a little grenade of discomfort and danger. So a small study published this week, showing that kids with severe peanut allergies can increase their tolerance through gradual exposure, is great news for allergic children and their caretakers. Just please, don't try this technique at home. Read More >>

research
Researchers Grow New Hair from Stem Cells for the First Time

This week, scientists announced a potentially revolutionary discovery in hair science: they've successfully turned mature skin cells into stem cells that develop into hair follicles. Read More >>

chatroom
Does Technology Help You Weather a Monster Storm?

Have you heard? We're having some pretty shoddy weather at the moment. Rain, wind, and excess flooding. Is that you? Are you using electrons and glowing screens to fend off the weather? Does that work? Read More >>

history
The Fascinating History of the Crossword, the Original Mobile Game

Look around at the people on a train, at a bus stop, or in an airport. Chances are, lots of them are playing some kind of game on their smartphones. But in any crowd, you'll likely see someone poring over a different pocket diversion — the crossword puzzle, still going strong on its 100th birthday. It's been a fascinating century. Read More >>

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