science
Can You Create a Perfectly Silent Space?

Imagine a place with no noise whatsoever: no sound, no light, no radio—hell, no Wi-Fi. How on Earth would you go about creating it? Read More >>

watch this
A Simple Photographic Trick Lets You See Invisible Things

The world is full of things you can't see: the heat coming off your hand, the spray of a sneeze, even the sound of two hands clapping. But a simple camera trick called Schlieren flow visualization turns those invisible waves of light into beautiful plumes of movement. With this trick you can literally see invisible things. Read More >>

art
Watch Magnetic Tape Fall Like Water in This Hypnotic Video

Japanese artist Ei Wada, who was born in 1987, belongs to a generation that spent middle school feverishly poring over cassettes to make mix tapes—until, of course, they were quickly outmoded by CDs, and then MP3s. Now, Ei makes art using the outmoded technologies he grew up with. Read More >>

science
Listen to the Sound of Atoms Bonding

You'd be forgiven for thinking that a large tuning fork, a nail, some Blu-Tack and a guitar amp sounded more like the contents of a DIY music studio than a science lab. But they are, in fact, all the ingredients required to listen to the sound of atoms bonding. Read More >>

science
Listen to the Purring, Electromagnetic Weirdness of Mushrooms

I was blown away when I first heard about a project that tried to tap into the electromagnetic communication potential of mushrooms. Using wires, radio waves, and circuits—not psychedelics—the project's off-kilter quest to find (and listen to) "electromagnetic fungi" was nonetheless more art than science. But who says mushrooms have the right to remain silent? Read More >>

audio
Berlin's BoomRoom Plays Sounds Only You Can Hear (and Touch)

You know how some big rooms have special spots where you can stand and hear someone whisper from a hundred feet away. What if speakers could do that, selectively slinging sounds to specific listeners for specific purposes? You'd never have to wear headphones again! Read More >>

design
This Insanely-Loud Sound System Simulates the Roar of a Rocket Launch

Being shot into space puts spacecraft under extreme stress—but did you know that the sound of the rocket launch can damage a craft? Inside the Large European Acoustic Facility, engineers recreate the incredible noise of a launch to make sure satellites can survive it. According to the ESA, "no human could survive" the sound. Read More >>

science
Eavesdropping on the Secret Sounds of Trees

What if we could identify plants not by sight but by sound? It's not entirely fanciful: every plant makes a unique set of sounds—an auditory signature, if you will—influenced by its physiology. But these sounds, usually in the ultrasonic range, are not for our ears. Read More >>

image cache
This is a Picture of the Sound a Helicopter Makes

This might look like the cut-stick project of a small child, but in fact this image visualises the noise that a helicopter makes as it tears through the air. Really. Read More >>

design
Why the Epidaurus Theatre Has Such Amazing Acoustics

Epidaurus, Greece, was a small, unassuming city in ancient times, best known for being the supposed birth place of Apollo's son, Asklepios the healer. As Asklepios' following grew, so too did the town. Read More >>

science
How an Underwater Bomb in Australia Was Heard Around the World

In 1960, scientists did one of those experiments that just aren't allowed anymore. For the sake of science, they blew up three 300-lb anti-submarine bombs off the coast of Australia. A listening station 10,000 miles away in Bermuda—on the exact other side of the planet—waited. And waited. Read More >>

audio
These Just Might be the Goofiest Lo-Fi Headphones You'll Ever Hear

Strapping on a pair of oversized headphones is a great way to shut out the world. But what if the beat was coming from outside the earpads?? For his latest trick, prolific sonic experimentalist Zimoun crafted a makeshift noise-maker out of a pair of mini-pizza-looking boxes, two prepared DC motors, and a couple of cotton balls. Read More >>

architecture
Watch: The World Trade Center Wails in Strong Winds

New Yorkers who live near One World Trade Center already have to contend with "fortress-like isolation" caused by the imposing NYPD security perimeter. But according to neighbourhood residents, there's something far spookier going on at the WTC site: A "ghoulish" howling that happens during storms and high winds. Read More >>

speakers
The World's Most Obscene iPhone Dock Is Bigger Than a Pony

With 28 speakers blasting around 125 watts, the original Wall of Sound made for an obnoxious home stereo system—let alone an iPod dock. But its creators have returned with a bigger and better solution: the Wall of Sound 2.0 that adds an extra 16 speakers, bringing the total to 44 (in addition to a pair of subs) for more decibels and bass than an iPhone dock ever needs. Read More >>

audio
A Tiny Matchbook-Sized USB DAC Will Make Your Headphones Sound Sublime

If you've dropped a small fortune on a nice pair of over-the-ear headphones but are just connecting them to your laptop's built-in headphone jack, you're probably not hearing everything you paid for. For a better sonic experience, a dedicated DAC—or digital to analog converter—is the route you want to go. And Cambridge Audio has managed to squeeze its new DacMagic XS into a package as small as a matchbox—so it's incredibly portable. Read More >>

science
We've Finally Figured Out Why Kettles Whistle

This might shock you, but for over a century scientists have been pondering why kettles whistle—and completely failed to find an answer. That's all changed now, though, thanks to two scientists from the University of Cambridge who have worked out how it happens. Read More >>

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