google
A Google Glass App That Helps the Watchers Watch the Watchmen

If you're committed to avoiding the gaze of the ever-growing number of cameras recording our every move, Google Glass hardly seems like a sensible purchase. That is, unless your face-computer can steer you around each camera's field of view. Enter Sander Veenhof's new Glass app, Watch Your Privacy. Now, you and your Glass can watch the watchers. Read More >>

security
Police are Testing a "Live Google Earth" to Watch Crime as it Happens

Last year in Compton, Los Angeles, police began quietly testing a system that allowed them to do something incredible: watch every car and person in real time as they ebbed and flowed around the city. Every assault, every purse snatched, every car speeding away was on record—all thanks to an Ohio company that monitors cities from the air. Read More >>

privacy
Report: NSA Used Heartbleed to Spy on People for Years

It's true. After days of speculation over whether the NSA knew about the Heartbleed vulnerability that affected as many as two thirds of the websites on the internet, two anonymous sources tell Bloomberg that the NSA didn't just know about it, they used it to gather intelligence. Read More >>

history
Pompeii's Ruins are Being Wired Up By an "Electronic Warfare" Firm

The ruined city of Pompeii—its residents' bodies so famously and eerily preserved by the very volcanic ashes that fatally buried them nearly 2,000 years ago—has seen better days. With neither the budget nor the personnel to protect itself against invading hordes of international tourists, the city is at risk of damage, structural collapse, and petty vandalism. Worse, the very ground beneath it might be unstable, leading to a much more dangerous problem down the road. Read More >>

drones
South Korea Thinks it Found Two Crashed Drones From North Korea

On Wednesday, South Korean officials unveiled photos of two rudimentary drones that crashed over the border, on South Korean land, around the same time the country exchanged live fire with North Korea. And, indeed, they think it was the North Koreans who sent the drones—if you want to call them drones, that is. Read More >>

privacy
The NSA's Been Spying on Every Single Call, Text, and Email in Iraq

A couple weeks ago, we learned from leaked documents that the NSA has the capability to record an entire country's calls, texts, and email in real time. That's a hell of a capability, and those documents revealed that it was being used in one country. Now, thanks to a retired NSA leader, we know which country that is: Iraq. Read More >>

design
24 Hour Surveillance is Just Fine When the Cameras are This Adorable

With revelations that the GCHQ pretty much has complete access to our online lives, there's been a recent spike in public concern over surveillance. However, in the real world it's hard to be upset about security cameras always staring down at you when they look like adorable woodland and jungle creatures. Awwww, there goes my privacy. Read More >>

security
This Facial Recognition Software Signals the End of the Security Guard

Minority Report references are old hat in the tech world. In fact, it's often a great way to describe technology that, as the cliché goes, "sounds like something out of a Philip K. Dick novel," yet is destined to remain a fiction. But this futuristic facial-recognition security system is the exception. It exists, and it's scarily good. Read More >>

privacy
NSA System Can Record Entire Countries' Calls for 30 Days at a Time

Remember all that business about the NSA saying it only collects phone metadata? Yeah, that's not true. Not only can the NSA listen in on foreigners' phone calls. It can record "every single" conversation in an entire country and store the recordings for 30 days at a time, a new Washington Post report reveals. Read More >>

security
The NSA Has Impersonated Facebook to Spread Malware

So the NSA is spying on you. You've known that for quite some time now. What you might not know much about is exactly how they're doing, and a new report from Ryan Gallagher and Glenn Greenwald offers up some pretty grizzly details about the agency's worldwide, automated malware network. Read More >>

booze
Scientists Built a Fake London Pub to Film Strangers Drinking Alcohol

At London South Bank University's shiny new pub, the drinks are free but they, uhh, may or may not actually contain alcohol. And it's not a real pub, actually. Oh, and there are little cameras all over the place tracking your every movement. Read More >>

apps
This Anti-Snooping App Catches People Who Spy on Your iPhone

Have you ever wondered if people are spying on you? Not to be paranoid or anything, but we all leave our phones unattended sometimes. It's not hard for a friend—or foe—to take a quick look at your text messages. But don't fret. Read More >>

drones
Can the NSA Really Send a Drone to Bomb Your Phone?

The world woke up Monday morning to yet more unsettling news about how the NSA is spying on people. This time, though, the repercussions are deadly. Read More >>

privacy
Want to Avoid the NSA? Use a Mobile Phone

Holy crap, the latest NSA report is actually good news—sort of. Despite what you've heard in the past nine months, the NSA only collects information on 20 per cent or fewer US calls. Why? Because they're having a hard time figuring out how to tap mobile phones. Read More >>

privacy
UK Spies Messed About Launching DDoS Attacks on Anonymous and Lulzsec Members

New revelations from Edward Snowden's massive pile of governmental shame reveals that GCHQ experimented with DDoS attacks as a way of keeping online activists in check, turning the favoured internet weapon of the underground masses against some of the usual suspects. Read More >>

privacy
UK Government Can Spy on our Facebook Likes, YouTube Viewing and More

GCHQ, our intelligence agency, is apparently able to spy on pretty much every aspect of our social lives, monitoring Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, most likely accessed by "tapping into" data cables. They call the programme "Squeaky Dolphin" and yes, that's the official logo. Don't laugh, it's serious stuff. Read More >>

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