techversary
Nine People Who Thought Gmail Might Have Been an April Fools' Prank

Gmail's officially entering its tender tween years today, and after a decade with the internet's favourite email service, we can barely even remember our lives without it. But then, that's why we have the internet—to remember for us. Read More >>

facebook
The Most Important Facebook Redesigns in Facebook's 10-Year History

Ten years ago today, Mark Zuckerberg gave birth to The Facebook and launched an online social revolution in his Harvard digs. We all know what happened next—thanks in no small part to an eight-time Academy Award-nominated film. With such humble beginnings, no one could have predicted the wild success (and cries of outrage) the site's many iterations would bring over the years. Read More >>

techversary
The Right to Record Movies From TV Came 30 Years Ago Yesterday

Today, DRM fears inspire a lot of jokes that reference George Orwell's 1984. But it was in that titular year, three decades ago today, that the US Supreme Court reached a decision that defined and protected the right to record copyrighted material: Sony Corp. of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc., or the Betamax case. Read More >>

advertising
14 Absurd Ads From Before We Knew Cigarettes Could Kill You

Fifty years ago today, in 1964, the US Surgeon General released one of the most progressive documents on smoking of its time, stating definitively that, yes, smoking tobacco can indeed be fatal. With it, the Untied States' cigarette culture began its (often frustratingly, grudgingly slow) overhaul from one of hipness and health to shame and decrepitude. Read More >>

techversary
It's Been a Full Decade Since the Spirit Rover Landed on Mars

On January 4, 2004, the first of two identical robotic exploratory rovers, NASA's Spirit, snapped this stunning 360 degree image of its surroundings, moments after setting down on Mars. In the years to follow, both Spirit and its sister Opportunity helped revolutionise our understanding of the Red Planet. Read More >>

watch this
45 Years Ago, Doug Engelbart Gave the Most Important Tech Demo Ever

On December 9th, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart—along with 17 researchers from Stanford -- gave a 90-minute live public demonstration of the technology they'd been working on for the previous 6 years. It changed the face of technology -- and you can watch it in full here. Read More >>

techversary
The Last Supersonic Flight of the Concorde Was 10 Years Ago Today

We were promised supersonic flights. Today, we stay well below the speed of sound. We were promised transatlantic flights from New York to London in three and a half hours. Today, that flight takes us seven hours. We were promised the future of flying. That future hasn't existed for 10 years. The last flight of the Concorde was on October 24, 2003, we've been flying on slow-haul planes since. Read More >>

techversary
Happy Belated Birthday to Android, Which Turned 5 Years Old Yesterday

Yesterday in 2008, Google executives stood on stage and announced the much-rumoured T-Mobile G1 (also known as the HTC Dream). It was the first commercial product to run a new, Linux-based operating system called Android. It turned out pretty OK for Google, don't you think? Read More >>

techversary
The Audio Cassette Is 50 Years Old Today

The natural descendant of the 8-track—which used similar magnetic tape but housed it in a much bigger, bulkier frame—the audio cassette, was the brainchild of engineers at Philips. Its precise birthday is open to some debate, but Philips is insistent that the format was officially launched at its Amsterdam HQ on September 13th, 1963. Read More >>

techversary
The Greatest Google Doodles From Each Year of Google's History

Yesterday marked the official 15th birthday of everyone's favourite startup search engine turned tech giant turned Big Brother. And even though many have had their gripes, it's hard not to look back at our Google-fueled time online with a sense of fondness. Because no matter where you might find yourself in life, you know that Google will always be there with a delightful little doodle to commemorate every possible occasion they can find an excuse for—special or otherwise. Read More >>

space
10 Years Ago, Opportunity Rover Began a 90-Day Mission That Never Ended

When NASA's Opportunity rover launched on July 7th, 2003, expectations were modest. It would spend 90 Martian days exploring soil and rock samples and taking panoramas of the Red Planet; anything else would be a bonus. Nearly ten years after its initial shift was up, Opportunity is still going strong. Read More >>

retromodo
The First Ever Electronically Stored Program Ran 65 Years Ago Today

Sixty five years ago, in a cluttered lab in Manchester, UK, three scientists changed the world of computing forever. Working with a machine they'd built and nicknamed Baby, they ran the first ever program to be stored electronically in a computer's memory. Read More >>

techversary
How Michael Crichton Gave Birth to the Movie Pixel

Pixelation: we rely on it today to obscure nudity and lewd gestures on TV. But did you know that we have a 1973 Michael Crichton sci-fi film called Westworld to thank for the image-blurring digital effect?
Crichton—who was relatively inexperienced at the time—wanted to create something that, onscreen, looked like a blurred digital machine. He first turned to NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab but they require £130,000 and nine months, both of which were deal breakers. So Crichton sought out John Whitney, Jr., the son of a famed experimental filmmaker. Read More >>

retromodo
Twenty Years Ago Today the World Wide Web Went Public

That decision, pushed forward by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, transformed the internet, making it a place where we can all freely share anything and everything — from social media updates, through streamed music, to YouTube videos of cats. It has fundamentally shaped the way we communicate. Read More >>

gaming
Happy 24th Birthday Game Boy (and Now I Feel Old)

In celebrating the life and times of the Game Boy brand, we've put together a historical, at times emotional, look back at the Game Boy's evolution over its 16 years of development, from the original Game Boy to the Game Boy Micro. Read More >>

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