architecture
Why the US Government Will Spend £1.2 Million to Promote Wooden Skyscrapers

The US Department of Agriculture doesn't usually meddle in architecture, but this week at an event at the White House, it announced an unusual project: A $1 million (£600,000) competition for high-rise buildings built out of wood—and another million that will go to educating architects about it. Read More >>

architecture
Watch a Micro-Apartment Transform Into a Five-Room Suite

The 43-storey De Rotterdam is one of Europe's largest buildings. Inside, however, it's a study in how to inhabit a small space: the behemoth's tiniest unit is only 645 square feet (60 square metres), yet because it's kitted out with incredible transforming furniture, it functions like a five-room apartment. Read More >>

architecture
The World's Tallest Building May Soon be Without Elevators or A/C

Rent at the 163-storey Burj Khalifa doesn't come cheap. While a one-bedroom "only" costs £33,000 a year, it's the £15,000 service fee that really gets you. Now, a fight over these fees may force tenants to make the climb home on foot. Read More >>

architecture
The Brutally Beautiful Wastelands of Outer Moscow

The seam where a city meets the country is an uncanny place. It's not rural, yet not exactly urban, either, a non-place often full of half-finished streets and isolated developments. Most of us only see these environments through the windows of our cars, but photographer Alexander Gronsky has spent the last four years in Moscow's outskirts, watching and photographing. Read More >>

architecture
Skyscraper Candles Let You Safely Set the World on Fire

"I like watching these buildings burn," says Jing Jing Naihan Li, a young Beijing architect. That would normally come off as ominous, but in this case, it's awesome: Naihan makes candles that are modelled after the tallest buildings in the world. Because, after all, aren't skyscrapers just the candles on the glitter covered double chocolate ganache birthday cake that is the city? Read More >>

architecture
Elaborate Chinese Real Estate Scam Traps Owners in Illegal Flats

In New York, shady brokers have long been known to sell the same apartment to multiple gullible buyers. In China, however, real estate scammers have gone to the next level: Buyers are being “taken hostage” by developers who fail to mention that the apartments they’re selling are totally illegal. Read More >>

photography
These Stomach-Churning Views Were Shot From Europe's Highest Ledges

Remember the young Russian photographers who illegally climbed the Great Pyramid of Giza a few months back? They're back, fresh off a month-long Eurotrip which took them to the Cologne Cathedral, Gaudi's Sagrada Familia, and at least one prison cell. And the photos they brought back will make your palms sweat. Read More >>

lego
How Tall Can a Lego Tower Be Before It Crushes Itself?

Every building material has a theoretical limit which it can't be used beyond: at some point, the weight of material above is enough to crush what's below. Now, a team of engineers has worked out that limit for Lego — and it's surprisingly high. Read More >>

computers
World's Thinnest Gaming PC Punches Above Its Weight

Far too many gaming PCs are hulking beasts. They don't call em "towers" for nothing. Digital Storm is trying to fight that chunky, space-stealing trend with its new Bolt PC. Billed as the world's thinnest, Bolt's form is certainly slender, but it doesn't want for more under the hood. Read More >>

lego
Korean Toddlers Build Tallest Lego Tower in the World

What did you do last week? Did you build a a 104-foot tall Lego tower, made of 50,000 bricks, with a team of kids who can pretty much not even talk? Didn't think so! Read More >>

architecture
It Could Cost as Much as £20 to Visit London's Shard Tower

While the lower floors of the Shard will be chockablock with the usual fast food palaces and high street chains, to cast your eyes across London's glorious skyline from the 68th floor it'll cost you the same amount that a zones 1 - 2 weekly travelcard costs. Well, back in 2005 anyway. Read More >>

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