cities
Berlin is Threatened From Below by its Rising Water Table

While the American West stumbles forward into an already dangerous drought—and it's barely even summer—Berliners are simply not using enough water. This means that the city's water table is now on the rise, and it's beginning to threaten the city's buildings from below. Read More >>

science
Inside the DIY World of Mapping Caves With Radio

Underground, where this is no GPS and certainly no Wi-Fi, mapping caves requires a different kind of technical ingenuity. Thus, there is cave radio. To learn about the DIY world of cave radio and underground exploration, Gizmodo picked the brain of Stanley Sides, tinkerer and former president of the Cave Research Foundation. Read More >>

design
The New Budapest Metro Line is an Awesome Psychedelic Trip

>After ten years of extremely expensive, slow, and politically messed up construction work–it is a long and sad story of government corruption and incompetence–Budapest, the Hungarian capital, got its fourth metro line today. Despite its ill-fated genesis and controversial usefulness, the Metro 4 is an amazing engineering, architectural, and artistic achievement, a mix of stunning concrete structures and trippy ornamentation. It looks stunning. Read More >>

transport
London Post Office Railway Reopening as a Tourist Attraction in 2020

London's Islington council has approved plays by Royal Mail to turn part of its relatively unknown underground postal railway into a tourist attraction, with letter, train and tunnel nerds able to come together to enjoy travelling a remodelled part of the line by the year 2020. Read More >>

infrastructure
A Colossal Yellow Cave Taking Shape Beneath New York

NYC's East Side Access Project continues apace, and these recent images, taken last month by MTA photographer Rehema Trimiew, show a whole new view of the mind-boggling underground caverns now being constructed beneath Manhattan. From raw walls of exposed geology to this, the space is finally taking on the look and feel of architecture. Read More >>

military
Training for Underground Warfare at a Nuclear Weapons Complex

In the early, angst-filled days of the Cold War, miners started carving the insides out of a hill between Dallas and Austin, Texas. The workers didn't know what they were building, but—at 7,000 acres—it was huge. At that point in time, it was only known as "Project 76." Read More >>

food
London's Newest Farm is an Abandoned Bomb Shelter Deep Beneath the City

What do you do with a bomb shelter when you're no longer getting Blitzed by the Nazis? For decades, Londoners have searched for ways to make use of old bomb shelters lurking deep underground. They've become data centers, dusty storage rooms, and, now, the first underground urban farm—thanks to a couple of foodie entrepreneurs and a Michelin-star chef. Read More >>

architecture
Why the AIA Just Gave Their Most Prestigious Award to an Underground System

It's a question that pops up again and again during the perennial cycle of annual architecture awards: Why do we only honour new buildings for great design, when the test of time is yet to come? It's an inequality that the American Institute of Architects has being trying to address for decades. Read More >>

transport
Man Missing for Two Days After Tube Door Separates Him from Son

In what sounds like an unfortunate rendering of that scene from Sliding Doors, a Romanian tourist has gone missing after being separated from his son for two days when a Tube train shut its doors before he could climb onboard. Read More >>

monster machines
They Finally Found What's Blocking The World's Largest Tunneling Machine

Ever since the colossal machine tunnelling under Seattle, nicknamed Bertha, was stopped in its tracks, there's been a frenzied speculation about what mysterious "object" could possibly block such a powerful machine. The answer is, at least partially, a big steel pipe. Read More >>

transport
How Corpses Helped Shape the London Underground

As Mexico City archaeologists sort through the surreal array of Aztec sacrificial skulls recently uncovered while excavating their city's subway system, it's worth remembering that parts of the London Underground were also tunneled, blasted, picked, and drilled through a labyrinth of plague pits and cemeteries. Read More >>

monster machines
Mysterious "Object" Stops World's Largest Tunneling Machine

Bertha, the world's largest tunneling machine, churning through the rock and mud beneath Seattle, has hit a mysterious roadblock—so mysterious, it is only known for now as "the object." Read More >>

locations
Swedish Ice Hotel Adds London Tube Train to Chiselled Exhibits

The ICEHOTEL, in a region that calls itself Swedish Lapland, has completed this year's collection of ice-made artistic treasures, which include a suite inspired by the London Underground's 150th anniversary. All the fun of being on the tube without any of the sweat. Read More >>

architecture
Learn Real-Life Minecraft at London's First Academy for Tunnelers

In today's Observer, architecture editor Rowan Moore explores Europe's largest infrastructure project: London's new Crossrail line. Moore explains that, in addition to such factors as cost, miles, tonnes of dirt moved, and other construction superlatives, Crossrail also "claims to be the largest archaeological site in Britain, an inadvertent probe through a plague pit, a Roman road, a madhouse cemetery, [and] a Mesolithic 'tool-making factory.'" Read More >>

rumours
Amazon to Take Over Closed Tube Station Ticket Offices as Parcel Collection Points?

While it seems Londoners are unanimously in favour of London Underground's plans to run Tube services through the night from 2015, few will be pleased to hear that with the move also comes the closure of manned ticket offices, and a host of resultant job losses. But Amazon may be about to give that cloud its silver lining. Read More >>

transport
Jubilee Line is London's Favourite Tube Line, While Everyone Hates Going North

A poll of Londoners has found that the Jubilee Line and its futuristic late-1990s concrete and glass extension is their favourite way of getting about the place, with the elderly and congested Northern Line the most hated. Read More >>

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