science
Do Colour Blind People See More Colours When They Take Hallucinogens?

If you gave a colour blind person something like LSD or some other sort of hallucinogenic drug, would they see colours they couldn't before? Read More >>

review
DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ Review: Buttery Smooth Quadcopter Video

DJI has been making remote-control quadcopters for years. Originally, you had to strap your GoPro to it, but last year DJI introduced the Phantom 2 Vision, which had its own integrated camera system. It was pretty sweet, but every tiny turn you took your video shook enough to scramble your viewer's brain. Read More >>

science
This is What It's Like to See the World as a Fly or a Chameleon

Ever wondered how weird-eyed animals like flies and chameleons see the world? Now you can take a look for yourself. Read More >>

science
Looking at Orange Light is Like Drinking a Cup of Coffee

Light is an incredibly powerful force. Sure, it helps us see and gives us fast internet, but medical researchers keep stumbling upon new positive side-effects. A team of Belgian scientists, for instance, just discovered how a ten minute blast of orange light increases brain activity related to cognition and alertness. Read More >>

science
This Simple App Can Train Your Brain to Have 20/7.5 Vision

Everybody wishes they had super powers. The big problem with that shared ambition, however, is that super powers do not exist. Not unless you count superhuman vision. That does exist, and a new app promises to help you attain it. Read More >>

watch this
The Images in This Video Can Screw Up Your Brain and Vision

I squinted my eyes and covered the screen watching this video by Tom Scott because I don't want to have coloured vertical and horizontal lines ingrained in my vision. So I suggest you do the same and look away. No, seriously. Don't look too long or you're going to start seeing stuff that's not actually there. Read More >>

medicine
Scientists Use Gene Therapy to Stop Six People Going Blind

A team of surgeons in Oxford have used a pioneering new form of gene therapy to stop six of their patients going blind and it's hoped the technique could be used to treat blindness more generally. Read More >>

science
How the 20/20 Vision Scale Works

With more than 150 million people over in the United States (nearly half of the population) requiring some form of corrective eyewear to compensate for visual impairment, chances are you have had your eyesight graded on the 20/20 scale before. If you haven't, you have probably heard other people saying they have "20/20 vision" or even the phrase "hindsight is 20/20." The vision scale is so prevalent in American culture that there's even a TV news show named after it. Read More >>

animals
This is What it's Like to See the World as an Animal

If you've ever wondered how animals view the world, this video should satisfy your curiosity. It shows how five different animals—cats, dogs, rats, hawks and bees—see the world. Read More >>

science
If the Colour Pink Doesn't Scientifically Exist, Why Can We See It?

Absent from the visible spectrum and neither a wave nor a particle, the colour pink is, for many, a scientific enigma: how can a shade that doesn't even appear in the rainbow exist? The answer lies in colour theory. Read More >>

science
Why Your Dumb Eyeballs Keep Falling for Optical Illusions

Optical illusions are fun because you literally can't believe your eyes. But isn't it a little troubling that your eyes can get fooled like that? Why don't they show you the visual truth? How can you ever trust them if they don't? Read More >>

photography
This Ultrafast Camera Is Designed to Work Like a Human Retina

Photos and videos are not lightweight files, they quickly add up to gigabytes of data which can be a dealbreaker a lot of research. Engineers at the Swiss company iniLabs created a better way, a camera that borrows its mechanics from the marvels of the human retina.
The Dynamic Vision Sensor (DVS) works a lot like the human retina which makes for a hyper efficient and ultrafast camera. The individual neurons in our eyeballs don't actually record all of the information in our field of view; they just spot the changes in movement. This gets rid of tons of extraneous data from the surrounding scene. It's also exactly how the DVS works. By selectively recording only the motion, the DVS can record hours of video using very little power and only a few megabytes of data storage. Read More >>

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Watch How Silly People's Reaction Times Are in Slow Motion

This is fantastic. Distort measured people's reaction time by making them catch a falling ruler to see how quickly (or slowly) their brains can translate what they see into what they do. Putting the video to slow motion emphasises how silly our reaction times can be. Some of us are so slow we might not even catch the ruler!
Reaction time is a complicated thing! Most people have a delayed response of about 190 milliseconds. Using a falling ruler to test people's reaction times cleverly gives the test a form of measurement. And though you'll probably laugh and be surprised at how slow people can be, don't make too much fun of them because we're all probably just like that. [Distort] Read More >>

science
This New Contact Lens Basically Turns Your Eye Into a Telescope

Contact lenses are great if your only issue is near or farsightedness, but for those struggling with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness among older adults, those flimsy little lenses ain't going to cut it—or at least not the kind of contact lenses you're used to. But soon, AMD-sufferers could see their vision vastly improving thanks to a slim, adjustable telescope that sits right in the middle of their eye. Read More >>

advertising
Of Course This Optometrist's Business Card Doubles As an Eye Test

Here's a brilliant way to drum up new business if you're an optometrist. Myung Dong, an eye doctor in Jeju, South Korea, found the perfect way to convince the local elderly population that they could benefit from glasses or other vision treatments: a business card featuring a self-administered eye test. Read More >>

watch this
What Colour Means to Blind People

Tommy Edison, the wonderful blind film critic who once showed us how he used an iPhone, has a new video describing something nearly impossible for blind people to understand: colour. What's great is that even though Edison doesn't understand the concept of colour, colours still have meaning to him. Watch him describe what red, blue, orange, black and white. It's awesome to see colour from such a completely different perspective. [YouTube via Laughing Squid] Read More >>

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