televisions
LG's WebOS TV Hands-On: An Awesome Resurrection

CES this year has seen LG give official word that it would be using WebOS as the brains for 78-percent of its upcoming smart TVs. There was a lot to like about WebOS back when it ran on smartphones, but we were a bit skeptical about how it would get by in a smart TV. After all, smart TV user interfaces are almost universally bad. Not this time. We just got to spend some hands-on time with WebOS running on a few of LG's 2014 TVs, and we really liked what we saw. The first thing you'll notice is that navigation is incredibly fast. Using the joystick on the remote control, you guide the cursor around the screen, and as you do things pop up instantly. Not only that, everything is animated and really attractive. From the home screen you can access all of your favourite apps (and there are a lot already, from Netflix to Google Maps). If you don't like how they're laid out, you can just drag and drop to move them around. Very intuitive. There are a fair number of second-screen like features built-in. For example if you're watching a Danish murder mystery on TV you can pop open an overlay on the right side that will give you more info on it, and/or links to other shows it thinks you'll like. It's all very nicely integrated. The LG store acts as a sort of integrated hub for content. There you'll be able to download movies, TV shows, apps, and even games. You can plug a USB controller directly into the TV and play games as if there were a console attached. Or, if you don't have a physical controller, you can download an app to your smartphone and use it as a remote (it pairs via Wi-Fi). It was pretty responsive when playing a Spiderman game that had been downloaded for the demo, and while it looked pretty good, we're not talking PS4 graphics here or anything. One of the sticking points is text entry. If you wanted to enter in some search terms, or type a URL into the built-in web browser, you'd have to pull open a keyboard, and hunt and peck your way through with the cursor. That's how Roku players work, too, and it's very tedious. To counter this, LG has included options for voice and gesture controls. Using a voice search we were able to get the upcoming weather forecast and search for content. It wasn't entirely accurate, but to be fair, there was a lot of background noise. Hopefully it would work better in a home environment. The gestures are slick, too. You just raise a finger in the air (a polite one, please) and it immediately brings up an interface for adjusting the channel or volume simply by waving your finger. You can also bring your finger up to your lips to instantly mute. It was surprisingly responsive, though we have yet to see how it handles a room full of furniture and people. Some of the higher-end TVs will come with built-in cameras for this. Others will require you to purchase the small camera separately, and while WebOS will be on some of LG's Blu-ray players, the voice and gestures will be limited to the TVs. Overall, we were really impressed by how polished the system looked and how responsive it is. We generally hate smart TV UIs, but this felt like something very different. I can say without question that it's the best smart TV interface I've ever seen. It was actually smart! It didn't look like an early-2000s feature-phone. It didn't lag or stutter. It was designed like it was meant to be on a beautiful 4K TV, and that says a lot. Obviously, we only got to see a little bit of it, and the only thing we were allowed to use ourselves was the gesture control, so only time will tell if it can measure up to these auspicious first impressions. Hopefully we'll be reviewing one when they start rolling out later this year. Read More >>

televisions
LG Will Power 70 Per Cent of its Smart TVs With WebOS

Resurrecting Palm's ill-fated mobile OS – which never truly delivered on phones – LG's new range of webOS-powered TVs will make up a staggering 70 per cent of the company's 2014 Smart TV line-up. That's a very clear sign of commitment to the technology—but what can we expect from it? Read More >>

televisions
Here's a Look at LG's Smart TV webOS Resurrection

Palm's webOS, once a dead-cert for smartphone OS supremacy, is tipped to be resurrected by LG at CES 2014 in a rather unlikely place -- a new line of the company's Smart TVs. And, thanks to Twitter leaker EvLeaks, we've got an early glimpse at what it will look like. Read More >>

retromodo
The Sleek WebOS Smartphone That Never Was

You're not looking at a new phone headed to stores any time soon — in fact, you're looking at the surprisingly sleek, all-touch webOS smartphone developed by HP which (sadly?) never was. Read More >>

business
LG Has Acquired webOS From HP to Power Smart TVs

LG has just announced that it has acquired the much-troubled webOS from HP. But instead of using it to power smartphones or tablets, it's planning to roll out smart TVs which will make use of the OS. Read More >>

wtf
Chubby Checker Sues HP Over Penis-Measuring webOS App

Chubby Checker has sued HP over a webOS app, also called Chubby Checker, that measures dick size. Read More >>

rumours
LG Working on an Open WebOS-Powered Smart TV

Google TV was a wonderful idea, but there's no denying that it's flopped. LG has a new idea, though, and is reportedly developing a line of TVs powered by the newly open-source webOS platform. Read More >>

hp
HP CEO Promises a Smartphone's Coming Because of Course It Is

After purchasing Palm, putting webOS on smartphones and tablets, and then giving up, it seems that HP has finally decided it needs to offer a smartphone. Pressured on the point in an interview with Fox Business, HP's CEO Meg Whitman said that the company "ultimately has to offer a smartphone." But when, where, how, and what are still up in the air. Read More >>

smartphones
HP's Open Source WebOS Code Has Arrived. Will Anyone Actually Use It?

There's almost no reason for any normal person to get excited about the beta release of open source WebOS, but for those of us who still can't come to grips with the fact that Palm's stunted mobile OS was an abject failure, there's still a faint beacon of light to soothe the soul. Read More >>

hp
Palm Reincarnated as Gram; Shifts Focus to Software, UX and the Cloud

The company behind The Little OS That Simply Couldn't, is changing form yet again. after being formerly dubbed by HP the (rather boring) webOS Global Business Unit, it is now emerging as a totally new and fresh identity called Gram, alongside a slight tilt in focus. Read More >>

hp
HP's WebOS Team Is Moving to Google

Poor little webOS, it just can't catch a break. Now, the Verge is reporting that a large chunk of HP's webOS team is leaving the company and moving on to Google. Read More >>

hp
HP Dumps 275 Employees from the webOS Team

It's been a rough ride for webOS of recent times. But despite the OS continuing to survive, HP has decided to ditch a large chunk of it's development team. Read More >>

hp
Jon Rubinstein Is Leaving HP

Jon Rubinstein, the former Apple exec, godfather of webOS and CEO of Palm, has left HP, reports AllThingsD. The move isn't too surprising as the writing has been on the wall since he left HP's Palm unit last summer to move to a lesser role at HP's Personal Systems Group. [AllThingsD] Read More >>

smartphones
Open WebOS 1.0 Coming in September

When HP kinda, sorta killed webOS as a money-making endeavour, they promised to keep it alive as an open source project, but offered little in the way of concrete details. According to The Verge they've partially pulled back the curtain, revealing that Open webOS 1.0 should arrive in September. Read More >>

android
Loathe WebOS? CyanogenMod 9 To the Rescue

Got yourself an HP TouchPad when HP was flogging them off, but webOS just doesn’t float your boat? Rejoice, dear Android 4.0-loving friends -- CyanogenMod 9 is here to furnish your bargain-basement tablet with sweet, sweet Ice Cream Sandwich. Read More >>

hp
HP Insiders Claim WebOS Was Doomed From The Start

We're all well aware of the commercial problems that HP has endured with WebOS. But now, according to the New York Times, insiders have admitted that the software was doomed from the get-go. Read More >>

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