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By Chris Schilling on at

Swarovski Refract for iPhone and iPad: A Crystal-Clear Music Maker

Coined in 2000, the frankly horrible portmanteau “advergame” describes any videogame used to promote a brand. Yet the phenomenon predates the term: back in the early '90s, the likes of Mick and Mack: Global Gladiators and Cool Spot were convincing innocent kids to buy McDonalds and 7-Up, thus helping to kickstart the global obesity epidemic we’re always reading about. Ah, videogames.

Where's My Water? for iPad and iPhone: A Tragic Tale about an Anthropomorphic Lizard with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

By Bulent Yusuf on at

In the US, there's a persistent urban legend about pet lizards being flushed down the toilet, which then grow up to become angry, vengeful, sewer-dwelling alligators. This same legend was the inspiration for Eastman and Laird's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The lesson here is that cruelty to lizards is both detrimental to your health, and also incredibly lucrative.

The Dark Meadow for iPad and iPhone: Extremely Monstrous and Incredibly Beautiful

By Bulent Yusuf on at

With every week that passes, a new iOS game is released that's even more visually impressive than the last. Previously, Shadowgun held the crown for a scant seven days, bowling us over with console-quality graphics and gameplay. Now that accolade has been cruelly wrested - nay, snatched, along with a desultory poke in the eye - by atmospheric chiller The Dark Meadow. It blends together elements of first-person combat, role-playing and exploration, and it looks absolutely gorgeous.

Katamari Amore for iPhone and iPad: Take a Second Roll at Greatness

By Bulent Yusuf on at

It’s a universal truth, commonly acknowledged, that the first Katamari Damacy game on the iOS platform was a big pile of pants. By any other reckoning, I Love Katamari should have been a slam dunk; the psychedelic day-glo visuals, the irresistably giddy soundtrack, the frankly mental design of each stage... It all seemed a perfect fit for a portable device with an accelerometer. It couldn’t fail. It just couldn’t.